building a computer for my Son

I'm building a AMD 64 computer with my 12 year old Son. Trying to keep the cost down and I need some DDR400 3200 memory. I found this deal at tirger.com I have never used this brand of memory. Anyone using this brand? if so would you recommand it?
http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/searchtools/item-Details.asp?EdpNo=586829&sku=ULT30215 

Thanks
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jsarinanaI.T. ManagerAsked:
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thoffmanConnect With a Mentor Commented:
That's decent RAM, but that's also a huge rebate to wait for. If you can afford it, I'd suggest two things.

1) Get memory that doesn't require a rebate, but costs less upfront.
2) Get two sticks of 256 MB memory so you can take advantage of the dual-channel memory that the board supports. This is kind of like RAID for memory; the system sends some data to one stick and some to the other.

mWave has a set of Kingston brand 256 MB memory sticks for about $60. (http://www.mwave.com/mwave/viewspec.hmx?scriteria=BA19403). I haven't checked Newegg yet, but if they have a similar deal, you might want to order it from there, since it will save on shipping.

If you stick with the Tigerdirect offer, make photocopies of everything before you send it in and make sure you follow the rebate directions to the letter.
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avsmithsCommented:
I have this brand currently in my computer (I have the PC2700 model though).  I have not had any problems the 2+ years I have had it.  Plus it has a lifetime warranty so you really can't go wrong.
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francoisroseCommented:
One of the best thing to check is the compatibility between the motherboard and the memory.  Usually on ur motherboard brand's website is a list of memory recommended to use with it.  Without a doubt (from the reviews) Ultra seems to be a good brand, but it doesn't mean it will work for you.  Just make sure it does before you buy it.
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CallandorCommented:
That's a really good price, but keep in mind CAS latency of 3 is pretty slow.  It won't slow down games by a lot (the video card is more important), but if your son is into overclocking, this memory is not going to be good.
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PCBONEZConnect With a Mentor Commented:
The memory is probably just fine but TigerDirect has a long history of skipping out on their rebates.

( All you have to do is google: >> +"tiger direct" +review +rebate << and you can see for yourself. )

If you buy from them expect to pay full price and never see any rebate money back.
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avsmithsCommented:
I agree with PCBONZ, after looking at the forms, I wouldn't really count on the money from the rebate.   Seems weird.  The brand wouldn't give you a problem though.
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PCBONEZCommented:
Two compatability things to look at that people miss:

The voltage:
Once in a while the acceptable range on a motherboard doesn't match the range on the memory.
This usually happens with that extereme high end memory. An example might be a board that's 2.4-2.5v and modules that are 2.6v. (If manufacturers stuck strickly to the DDR specification this wouldn't even be an issue. Some 'cheat' a little to optimise performance of their product.)

The memory density:
This will be determined by the chipset used on the board.
High density is cheaper.
Low denisty is more universally compatible.

What consitutes High/Low density with DDR is not the same as with PC100/PC133 which makes things confusing.
I have seen some memory retailers address this as:  Old low density, New low density, and High density.

You are looking at PC3200 so this is here just to explain some things you might see in shopping.
Intel chipsets before i845 that use SDRAM all REQUIRED "old low density" memory.
(DDR is still SDRAM although it's not usually spoken of in those terms.)

Intel 845 chipsets are not compatible with high density memory but will work with the "new low denisty".
("New low density" would be high denisty if you were looking at PC100/PC133 memory.).

I -think- all the Intel chipsets i865 and above are good with high density modules.
I -think- all VIA chipsets are.
I don't know about SIS or nVidia chipsets because I haven't used any.
(I -think- is because I don't have time to double check today.)

I have been using -low density- Samsung PC3200 for the last couple years.
(Samsung is widely used in pre-built systems. Dell, HP, Gateway.)
It comes in 3 'quality' levels (warranty).
They are all CL2.5 or better and on 6 layer low noise PCB's.
I have had zero issues even with the 1 year warranty version.
- I checked 3 places and the current price is around $55 +/- for 512MB modules.
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PCBONEZCommented:
AMD CPU noted. I forgot as I was writing. *blush*
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jsarinanaI.T. ManagerAuthor Commented:
PCBONEZ,
This is good and appreciated information. The motherboard I will be using is the following: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E16813157081 

would you see any any issue running this memory on this board? if you don't mind me asking?

Thanks
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jsarinanaI.T. ManagerAuthor Commented:
Thoffman,
Thanks for the reply. I never use Tiger. I use Buy.com Newegg.com, CDW, HP and Dell. The only reason I used Tiger was because of the hot deal they had going on. I have a feeling I'm not going to save anything after all. I should have waited for more of these responses here before ordering. Yes I do plan on using DDR2 later that is an excellent point

Thanks
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PCBONEZCommented:
jsarinana
I don't see any problems with that memory on that board.
ASRock is actually a joint venture between Asus and PcChips. Asus wanted to get into the low end market and PcChip wanted to bypass their bad reputation. They got together then *poof* -> ASRock.
Anyway, their boards aren't too picky about memory from anything I've heard.

Note on something else you said. Dual Channel and DDR2 are two different things.
DDR2 is 200 pin DDR memory. (Vice the 184 pin DDR memory.)
Dual Channel is a method of using memory and not a memory type.
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jsarinanaI.T. ManagerAuthor Commented:
PCBONEZ,
thanks for the clarification.
So DDR can be used by a MB that does dual-channeling and is 184pin memory inserted on a board  with 184pin slots

DDR2 is a 200pin DDR memory that is used on a board with 200pin slots, DDR2 memory has more benifits then DDR such as prefetch size, burst length, less vol and data rate ect..

when a board offers dual-channeling it's best to have multi sticks so I can take advantage correct?
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PCBONEZCommented:
Yes if you want to use dual channel mode you need memory modules in matched pairs.
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jsarinanaI.T. ManagerAuthor Commented:
Thank you everyone for your help
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