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Suggestions for dumb terminal connection to internet

Posted on 2006-11-14
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I have a remote office with several dumb wyse terminals. They currently use a multiplexor and leased line to access the data center computer. I want to switch to using the internet instead of the leased line. At the data center I have a Pix 501 and a linux server. Does anyone have any recommendations for the type of hardware I would need at both sites?
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Question by:Mid-Atlantic-Data
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by:simsjrg
ID: 17940648
A 2nd Pix 501 at the remote office and configure a VPN tunnel between the two sites. You will need a static IP at both locations.
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by:Mid-Atlantic-Data
ID: 17941014
I do not fully understand the setup at the remote office. How would the dumb terminals know how to go through the pix to logon to the linux server?
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by:dlangr
ID: 17941029
I second simsjrg

Another thought:

I am not familiar with those terminals, but if you can run an ssh session from them and the data center computer can run an ssh session, that would provide you with an secured and encrypted connection over the internet as wel. Require authentication with ssh keys protected with a password if you like an higher level of security.
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by:giltjr
ID: 17942444
If they are real dumb wise terminals, you will not be able to use them over the Internet as they need a serial direct connection to the host.  No IP invlovled.

I do not know if they exist, but if there is such a thing as a "IP enabled MUX" you could replace your current MUX's connect the Wyse termianls to them, then use the Internet to have the two MUX'es talk to each other.  Somthing like:

Wyse <serial connection> MUX <IP over the Inernet> MUX (operating as a de-mux'er) <-- serial connection -> host

Now, Wyse did make some Windows based "dumb" terminals that did support telnet.

How does the Wyse terminals connect to the hosts on the Data Center end?
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by:Mid-Atlantic-Data
ID: 17947338
The dumb terminals consist of a monitor and a keyboard. They themselves can do nothing. They currently connect using RS232 serial connection to a serial board which treats them like tty terminals.
Would a terminal server or console server at the remote office provide any help?
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by:giltjr
ID: 17948453
It depends on what is at the remote office now.

I know you have:

  WYSE <-- serial --> MUX <-- T1 -->

But what is at the other end?  Is it like:

  WYSE <-- serial --> MUX <-- T1 -->  MUX <-- serial --> host

If this is what is looks like, then you need something on both ends that can connect the two MUX's together using IP.

The is at both offices.  The terminals can't do IP, so then must be connected to something that can.

Can the host support telent traffic?  If so it may be better to dump the Wyse terminals, get some PC's and use telnet over the Internet.
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by:Mid-Atlantic-Data
ID: 17981600
we are looking to eliminate the Mux connections because it requires a expensive proprietary hardware cards at the data center. The host would perfer not to do telnet sessions but would still need secure connections and transmission through the internet.
I was wondering if any one had any input on using term servers or device servers, like the IOLAN or STS series, or anything from Perle systems?
Before our company spent a lot of money, i was hoping to have a good method to accomplish this.
Thanks so much for your help.
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by:giltjr
ID: 17981757
It still depends on what you have on the host side.  Do you know how the connections are done at the host side?

It looks like you could do:

     WYSE x 4 <-- serial x4 --> IOLAN <-- T1 -->  IOLAN <-- serial x4  --> host
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by:Mid-Atlantic-Data
ID: 18047559
On the host side, we would like to use the LAN instead of rocketport serial cards because we would have to buy more expensive ones.
We also want to eliminate the T1 and leased lines.
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giltjr earned 400 total points
ID: 18048555
Where I have "T1" in my last diagram you can replace that with the Internet.
 
You need to look at what the host, the host OS, and the application used by the Wyse terminals can and can not do.

Obviously the host and the application right now exepct to see a serial connection to the remote terminals.  If it requires this, there is nothing you can do.  

If the application supports telnet clients, then you can get a standard PC and a Wyse terminal emulator that support telnet and get rid of the dumb terminals, mux's and the dedicated T1.



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