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"SortSequence=SharedWeight": in connection string

Posted on 2006-11-14
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Last Modified: 2006-11-18
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was looking at the code this ex-developer wrote and he has this in his connection string:

SortSequence=SharedWeight;SortLanguageId=ENU

That makes upper case and lowercase characters sort the same..http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/redbooks/pdfs/sg246440.pdf


is that a good idea to specify that? (sql server doesnt have that connection values)
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Question by:Camillia
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by:momi_sabag
ID: 17941275
hi

i guess the answer should be it depends,
maybe the database contains data that is comming from 2 different systems,
one that uses lowercase and the other uppercase, but the database is not case sensitive
in this case , this would make sense

in order cases, it won't
it all depends on your application
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Kent Olsen earned 2000 total points
ID: 17941405

>>is that a good idea to specify that?

It depends on what you're trying to do.

A lot of modern utilities disregard case when sorting.  It's a lot easier to hunt through a list when case isn't an issue.

Consider sorting file names where any letter could be a capital letter.

file1
File1
fIle1
FIle1
fiLe1
FiLe1
...

Are all unique names.  if the list of file is significant you'll have to search at least two places (those names starting with 'F' and those starting with 'f') to see all of the files.  If the list is really long you may have to search may places in the list.

And it makes comparison easy, too.

SELECT * FROM [table] WHERE last_name = 'Smith';

Capitalization no longer matters as the collation sequence resolves it.  'Smith' = 'smiTH', etc.


Good Luck,
Kent
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