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Calculate Value of Pi

I remeber a LONG time ago (1981-1982), coming across a BASIC program that would calculate the value of Pi to a specific number of decimal places. It stored each 'digit' in an array element and then when the calculation was complete, just concatenated all of the digits. It was limited by memory size (how large you could dimension the array).

I know the need for a value of Pi to any more than 5 or 6 decimal places is probably overkill unless you are trying to aim a rocket at a star a few million light years from earth, but I recall it was kind of fun to have a sheet of paper filled with digits and telling everyone it was Pi to 1,200 decimal places (or whatever it was-back in the days of 64K RAM you were kind of limited).

Does anyone have a similar VB program laying around just gathering dust? As I recall, with my old system (it was even before the days of the IBM PC), it took almost 3 days to calculate Pi to whatever the limit was (as I recall, it was around 1,200 decimal places).

Doug
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dbbishop
Asked:
dbbishop
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Guy Hengel [angelIII / a3]Billing EngineerCommented:
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dbbishopAuthor Commented:
These are 'okay' but give a limited value of Pi. Using Atn() or a series limits the value to can return to the number of digits supported by the number type you use within your OS. The neat thing about the iteration I recall is that, as I stated, each digit was stored in an element of a string array and after calculating 1000 elements, you just concatenated all the elements together. I believe you started out with 3.14 and went from there. So whatever the calucation was, at the end you ran code similar to:

Print "3.14";
For i = 0 to UBound(a)
    Print a(i);
Next i
Print

Each element in a() was just a single digit. As I recall, the program used a couple of nested For...Next loops and was written in BASIC. Anyone out there with fond memories of such a program?
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zorvek (Kevin Jones)ConsultantCommented:
Found this:

http://www.po28.dial.pipex.com/maths/software.htm

About half way down the page is VB source code to do what you want.

Kevin
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