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change UID for accounts in Linux (Redhat)

Posted on 2006-11-15
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Due to some requirements, I need to change some users account UID.
I need to know what are the necessary/relevant changes that need to be made once the UIDs are changed. And also how do they related to processes and file permissions and to the applications & DBs running on the systems.

Bottomline is I do not want to change something which I am not aware of the consequences.
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Question by:dc-ops
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ssvl earned 750 total points
ID: 17945657
you can always check with

find / -uid xxx

where uid is the number of the person whose uid you want to change.  this gives a list of all files owned by that person / user.

if nothing dangerous appears on the list, (apart from the home directory files or one odd files), then you can go ahead and change the uid of the person.

what are the "applications and DBs running" on the system.  i recently saw a script by someone who had given a bash scrip for changing the UID of files owned by a particular person.  but that is secondary.
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by:ssvl
ID: 17945662
for a change you might want to look at mail, home direcotry files and other things before and after change
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by:ssvl
ID: 17946049
if  You want to simply change the uid for user  use

# usermod -u <new uid> username
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by:Duncan Roe
ID: 17950275
Once you change the UID of a regular user, that user will cease to own his home dir and files within. As root you can fix this:-

# usermod -u <new uid> username

# chown -R username: ~username

The colon after username changes the group of the user's files to his default group - miss it out if you're not planning to change that. To make sure you're going to work on the rigt directory, yo can "echo ~username" first - that should echo the path of the user's home dir.

If you are changing the UID of a system user (mailer or whatever), follow the advice posted earlier (find command &c)
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