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Character Array Declarations

I realize that i can use :
char *filename;
filename = "aFile.txt";

and

char filename[20] = "aFile.txt";

There do get the same char array right? If so, when do you know when to use each one.

Are there any limitations to either? How does the pointer method realize the size of the array?
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bbcac
Asked:
bbcac
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1 Solution
 
Kent OlsenData Warehouse Architect / DBACommented:

Hi bbac,

The pointer method can not determine the size of the array.  It can determine the size of the string, but not the underlying buffer.

Which one is appropriate in a situation depends a lot on what you want to do with it.


--  Reserve a buffer in the program's variable block and preset it to "aFile.txt".

char filename[20] = "aFile.txt";

--  Reserve a buffer in the program's CONSTANTS block and preset it to "aFile.txt".  Set variable to the address

char *filename = "aFile.txt";


In the first example, filename is an array and behaves just like any other array.  The second example is subtlely different in that filename points to a string in read-only memory.  Try to change the value (perhaps by capitalizing the first character) and the program will abort.


So that's the primary difference.  One puts the buffer in the variables block and initializes it to your value.  The other puts a pointer in the variables block and references memory in the constants block.



Good Luck,
Kent
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bbcacAuthor Commented:
thanks
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karanaCommented:
hi Kent ,


>>>>>>>>>>>>>" The pointer method can not determine the size of the array.  It can determine the size of the string, but not the underlying buffer. "

               char *ptr  = "hello" ;

 ptr points to a a location in  DS .  ptr is unaware of the size of the string . U can see
                 printf("%d" ,sizeof(ptr));
       
 but when u try o print it
                              printf( "%s" , ptr) , this printf will actually search for  '/0' ,so it will print
the whole text  "hello "


      The allocation in DS for eg:
                      DS: 0x100     h  e l  l  o
                      DS:0x105     '\0'
 is done by the compiler .It purely depends on compiler .  So  i disagree with
           " It can determine the size of the string " 

 

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Kent OlsenData Warehouse Architect / DBACommented:

Hi karana,

A pointer contains no information about the string except its starting location.  Note that the compiler has little need for the length of the string except for reserving storage for the string.

The sizeof() macro will return the size of the object.  When the pointer method is used sizeof() will return the size of a pointer.  Probably 4.  When the array method is used sizeof() will return the size of the character array, not the length of the string.

The C string utilities can determine the length using strlen().  It doesn't matter how the string is defined.


So I stand by the statement that, "The pointer method can not determine the size of the array.  It can determine the size of the string, but not the underlying buffer".

Kent
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karanaCommented:

thank you .
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