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Inhertiance question

Posted on 2006-11-15
3
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Last Modified: 2010-04-01
Hi Experts,

I have been having some strange things happening in my code.  It worked one or two times and not after.  I began to doubt there is some problem in the way I am using inheritance/polimorphism.  here is the simplified version of the code.  Am I doing something wrong?  I tried this in visual studio 6.0 and it seems to work all the time.( Printing 3)

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class A
{
      
public:
      A() {};
      ~A() {};
      virtual int getMember(){ return 0;};
      virtual void setMember(int i ) { memA = 0;};
private:
      int memA;
      
};

class B : public A
{
public:
      B(){ };
      ~B(){ };
      int getMember(){return memB;};
      void setMember(int a){ memB = a; };
private:
      int  memB;
};

class X
{
public:
      X(){};
      ~X(){};
      void setSomething(A& a){ cout << a.getMember() << endl;};
      
};



int main()
{

      X *xx = new X();
      B *ab = new B();
      ab->setMember(3);

      xx->setSomething(*ab);

      return 0;
}
0
Comment
Question by:thanesh
[X]
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3 Comments
 
LVL 86

Expert Comment

by:jkr
ID: 17953113
This is absolutely OK. Since 'getMember()' is declared virtual, 'X::setSomething()' will call 'B:getMember()' through the virtual function table.
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:thanesh
ID: 17953362
Thanks JKR. Am I using the pointers correctly.  Because, I would like to confirm this before I deal with my rest of the code.
0
 
LVL 86

Accepted Solution

by:
jkr earned 125 total points
ID: 17953371
Yes, you are (when we leave out the fact that you aren't deleting them before exiting ;o)
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