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Where can I find Export Specifications

Posted on 2006-11-16
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Last Modified: 2008-03-03
Hello All;

TIA for your help.

I have an Access application that uses a macro to export data.
The macro action is Transfer Text, the transfer type is Export Delimited
In the Specification Name field is the name of a specification.
I did not create this macro so I don't know what the specification is.
How can I view this specification or edit it? How is it created in the first place?
I can not find the specification name anywhere. It is not a table or query or file.

Thanks

Bob
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Question by:Rwardlow
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Jim Horn earned 500 total points
ID: 17956709
This may sound bass-ackwards, but you'll need to treat this as an Import Spec to get there.

File : Get External Data: Import, select your .txt file, Next button, click on Advanced button in lower left corner.

Edit the Inport Spec the way you wish, save, then just refer to it in your export.
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by:dancebert
ID: 17957020
File : Get External Data: Import, select ANY .txt file, Next button, click on Advanced button in lower left corner.

Then click the Specs button.  A dialog box opens showing the existing import and export specs.  Select the one named in your code, then click Open.  You'll be back at the screen that shows Field Names, Data type, Start column and Width (# columns) for each field defined in the spec.
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