Can virtual function be defined and still requests derived classed to implement it

Hi Experts,

In the following example, I want functionOne( ) to be implemented by all of the derived classes of A including 'grand child' C.  So, If I leave the keyword 'virtual' in B's functionOne( ) then that means C does not have to implement it.  So, I want to keep the virtual keyword with B's functionOne( ).  Is it okay?  If we don't have class C, then we have A's functionOne( ), B's functionOne( ) both with the virtual keyword.  Will it cause any problem?

So, when I want derived classes to implement a function, no matter where they are in the class hierarchy then should I always keep the virtual keyword with the function.  

Thank you.

class A
{
   virtual void functionOne();
};

class B: public A
{

    virtual void functionOne() { cout << "B's functionOne" << endl;};
};

class C: public B
{
    void functionOne( );
};

void main()
{
    B bb;
   bb.functionOne( );
};
ambuliAsked:
Who is Participating?
 
AxterConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Hi ambuli,
>     virtual void functionOne() { cout << "B's functionOne" << endl;};
The virtual keyword does not do anything here, and it's optional.  Many programmers add the keyword to the derive function, just to add extra clarification.
But it serves no function as far as the compiler is concern.  The code would be compile the same with it or without it.

David Maisonave (Axter)
Cheers!
0
 
ambuliAuthor Commented:
Thanks Axter, Yes that is the results I got after doing some experiment.  By the way, the virtual seems to play some role in the constructor below.  If I don't have the virtual keyword in the destructor for AA, then when deleting b, only BB's destructor is called.  But, having the virtual keyword calls both destructor.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;



class AA{
public:
      ~AA( ){ cout << "A's destructor" << endl;};
};
class BB: public AA
{
public:
      ~BB( ){ cout << "B's destructor" << endl;};
};


void main()

{

      AA *b = new BB();
      delete b;


}


0
 
AxterCommented:
virtual plays a role in the base class, and you should have at least one virtual method in the base class if you're going to delete a derived object using the base class pointer.
0
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