Solved

Change root password from normal account

Posted on 2006-11-20
6
236 Views
Last Modified: 2010-03-18
I would imagine this is not possible, however I do not have physical access to this machine, nor do I remember the root password for this server.  I do have my own account that has administrative privileges, however I'd like to recover the root password somehow.

The server is a FreeBSD box running just qmail acting as a mail relay server.  Any ideas as to how I can recover the root password using a normal account from a remote location?

Thanks for any advice.
0
Comment
Question by:JWeb Admin
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
6 Comments
 
LVL 12

Accepted Solution

by:
ibu1 earned 500 total points
ID: 17985236
If you have administrative privileges to system means u can modify /etc/sudoers. Add any account to /etc/sudoers to grant access to all the commands like this
any ALL (ALL) ALL                                         -> any is the user name
save and exit

Now login as any account
do
# sudo passwd root
Enter password
Re-enter password


That's it
 

0
 
LVL 12

Expert Comment

by:ibu1
ID: 17985253
Sorry,its

any ALL=(ALL) ALL                                         -> any is the user name
0
 
LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:_iskywalker_
ID: 17987155
i am not sure, but if the sudoers dont work, try removing the file with  the passwordds (make a backup). then try to log in. be careful, i did not test it and i dont grant anything, i think it is VERY risky to do it, if yu dont have any manuall acces. if you have manual access, you could boot with a live cd, and repair, or change the thing without muich problem.
0
Stack Overflow Podcast - Frustrating Miracles

In this podcast, Stack Overflow interviewed Linux Academy CEO/Founder, Anthony James, and got his developer story!

"Follow your passion, be prepared to work hard and sacrifice, and, above all, don't let anyone limit your dreams."  - Donovan Bailey

 

Author Comment

by:JWeb Admin
ID: 17987388
There doesn't seem to be an /etc/sudoers file.  
0
 
LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:_iskywalker_
ID: 17987475
a group?
can you install the sudo package? it is very simple in linux but i dont know if it works on freebsd
0
 

Author Comment

by:JWeb Admin
ID: 17987535
Thanks i'll give that a shot
0

Featured Post

Efficient way to get backups off site to Azure

This user guide provides instructions on how to deploy and configure both a StoneFly Scale Out NAS Enterprise Cloud Drive virtual machine and Veeam Cloud Connect in the Microsoft Azure Cloud.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

I have seen several blogs and forum entries elsewhere state that because NTFS volumes do not support linux ownership or permissions, they cannot be used for anonymous ftp upload through the vsftpd program.   IT can be done and here's how to get i…
Note: for this to work properly you need to use a Cross-Over network cable. 1. Connect both servers S1 and S2 on the second network slots respectively. Note that you can use the 1st slots but usually these would be occupied by the Service Provide…
If you're a developer or IT admin, you’re probably tasked with managing multiple websites, servers, applications, and levels of security on a daily basis. While this can be extremely time consuming, it can also be frustrating when systems aren't wor…
Monitoring a network: why having a policy is the best policy? Michael Kulchisky, MCSE, MCSA, MCP, VTSP, VSP, CCSP outlines the enormous benefits of having a policy-based approach when monitoring medium and large networks. Software utilized in this v…

627 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question