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Printing from one network to another - Same office

Posted on 2006-11-20
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Last Modified: 2010-03-18
I have an SBS 2003 server with 2 NICS.  Inside NIC is the standard 192.168.16.x and the external NIC is the public IP from the ISP.  This server is located within a large office complex in which there is a stand alone printer that I need to print to.  That printer is located at 192.168.1.19.  How is this accomplished? Thank you!
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Question by:hifashion
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by:Jay_Jay70
ID: 17985170
usually to cross two networks you would have a static route, but considering one side of your network is sitting on the public internet, i wouldnt be doing that at all....Can i ask why you have a public IP direct on your machine
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by:Steve Knight
ID: 17985398
Its kinda how SBS pushes you into doing really... I assume and hope ISA server is running as a firewall on your SBS?

How can you reach this printer - where is the connection to it physically?  Do you have a router connection into your LAN from the building or do the building supply your internet side to the SBS too (in which case is it a private internal address actually or a real public one (post if not sure, 0 out the last number of the ip)

If the building give you access to this printer and other shared facilities from a network drop cable into you office it might be possible to add a small router to connect to you LAN.  Either way any connection to their kit must surely be planned and configured by them - are you trying to get 'backdoor' access?
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by:Jay_Jay70
ID: 17985597
ah see SBS is a mystery to me - cheers Steve
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by:hifashion
ID: 18064713
Thanks for the responses!
I thought that a static route was the solution but I'm either to stupid to follow the syntax, or that just isn't working.  Answering the question regarding a public IP directly connected to the machine is simple, I have 2 NIC's so SBS is the firewall.  
The connection to the printer is just in another room in the same building on a different LAN, which is the 192.168.1.x subnet.  I am not trying to connect via the "back door".  It's completely legit.  I just need to be able to make my LAN communicate with the other LAN.
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by:Steve Knight
ID: 18064824
I guess you've chosen an answer then but then real answer to your question if you have one interface on your LAN and one interface on the internet is that to get to the other printer you need an interface which is on a LAN routed to the network with the printer on...

How are packets supposed to get to the printer if your LAN and WAN connections don't connect to it??

Did you read my answer at all?  Did it not make any sense or did you just feel like selecting the first answer that came past?

Steve
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Author Comment

by:hifashion
ID: 18092697
Hi Steve.  I have used Experts Exchange for many years for research but never for actually posting comments or questions so I just clicked the wrong button.  My bad.  I put a third NIC in the server, connected it to an AP that can communicate with the wireless network on the correct subnet and things are working now.  I just shared the printer out from the server to my lan clients.  I do have another issue pertaining to this same configuration though.  The LAN also needs to connect to a public share on this other LAN (192.168.1.x).  Any suggestions how to do that? Static route?
Thank you!
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by:Steve Knight
ID: 18092877
No problem... Experts can get a bit annoyed when their work is given low grades or ignored altogether.... it is easy to split points with a split points link at the bottom of the Q or give it all to one with accept answer if you prefer.  Not having a go at you here BTW.

Would you like the question re-opened to continue with this, Jay_Jay are you a Page editor here?  If not hifashion just post a link to this Q in Community support and they will re-open.

If your pc's connect to your server as default gateway then they should be able to connect to this third network in terms of routing.  Is ISA server running on the ISA box.  If so you need to configure additional rules to allow the traffic through now, or instead connect a router to the LAN side instead of a NIC in the server and then you would need static routes on the server and/or clients.

What happens when you tracert or PING clients to these remote machines?  It MAY just be that you need a route back from the other side... i.e. the printer on the other LAN is able to talk to your server because it has an address on their subnet.  The device on 192.168.1.x will probably have it's gateway set to their internet connection so what is needed is a static route on THEIR machine... will give more detail if you wish once the Q is opened :-)
Steve
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by:Steve Knight
ID: 18099808
Thanks!

I would say as a first thing to try you need a static route adding on the machine with the shared drive, or ideally their default gateway router with a route back to your network via your server, I.e.

route -p add 192.168.16.0 mask 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.x  

where x is the address given to you on their subnet for your third nic.

Please come back now and we can work on this...

thanks

Steve
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Author Comment

by:hifashion
ID: 18275539
Thanks for keeping up on this Steve.  Im sorry for the long delays.  I promise to keep this open and get the high grade you deserve.  
I am still trying to get my LAN communicating with the LAN on the other subnet.  My server isn't running ISA Server. The server will communicate just fine with this remote share, however my lan clients cannot.  I don't have access to the remote hardware to add any routes.  Is this the "only" way to get this done? I did a tracert to the remote share from the server and there is just a single HOP.  
I will check back in later today.  Again, I truly thank you for sticking with this.  I will definitely be using this service more!
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by:Steve Knight
ID: 18276041
IMO Yes.  The clients on the other network will have to know how to get to yours - that would have to be their server or router or whatever you need to communicate with.

At the moment they can communicate with your server only ... we MIGHT be able to do it with RRAS doing NAT on the server but frankly the easiest way if you only have one IP on their network has got to be putting a NATting router between the two networks, taking the place of your server having the IP address.  This could be as simple as a £20 cable router or something more complex like a Cisco.

You'd connect the WAN side to their network and give it their fixed IP address and configure the LAN side to use an address on your LAN.  Then to communicatae with the other LAN you add a static route to your existing internet router or individually to machines using route add as before.

You can thenpotentially add firewall rules to restrict traffic from you to them and add port forwarding if you need any incoming services from their network.

Let me know how you want to proceed on this, with delays it is a bit difficult to remember everything!

Steve
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Author Comment

by:hifashion
ID: 18289712
How about I just hire you full-time?
I have 15 servers that we monitor/administer and I am buried with work.
Anyway, I have no access to the "other" network to do anything technical with so are we just out of luck communicating with it?
Thanks Steve!
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Steve Knight earned 125 total points
ID: 18290588
Haha!  Pretty busy myself and you'll  probably find we are in different continents :-)

If you have a network drop and one IP on the remote network a router as suggested would work without any changes to the remote network as the router would NAT the traffic so it appeared to come from that one address on their network.

If you remove the third nic connection on your server, purchase a small cable modem router (for now at least) and connect their cable to the WAN side giving the router's wan side the IP you have on their network (or leave it on dhcp if that is all you have) then set your  side of the router to an IP on your network.  Make sure dhcp server is turned off on the router as sbs will be doing that.

Now all you need to do is add a static route to your default gateway (presumably SBS) saying

route -p add 192.168.1.0 mask 255.255.255.0 192.168.16.x

where x is the router address on your network.  You could also add thos static route onto any other pc's that need to get to that network.

Good luck, if these things aren't  an option it may not be possible, but I can't see why the above can't be done

Steve
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by:Steve Knight
ID: 18299324
Good luck with getting it working

Steve
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