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New computer for existing user

Posted on 2006-11-21
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Last Modified: 2012-05-05
I just got a new desktop computer for a user in our office.   This user already has a computer connected to the domain and a user account.  I’m wondering what is the best way to go about switching out the computers for this user without causing problems with the user's account.

Is it as easy as setting up the new computer for the domain, creating a new user account with the same username as before and logging on to the domain as the user?

We will probably want to use the user’s old computer for a new user later on.
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Question by:jhulsey
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glennbrown2 earned 50 total points
ID: 17987264
First of all, connect the new computer to the domain.  Then you can log onto the new computer with any user account in Active Directory.

You can use the Files and Settings transfer Wizard built into XP to 'export' the users profile, then import to the new computer if you really want to (http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/winxppro/deploy/mgrtfset.mspx).  That way, the user will have their old desktop, favourites etc.
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