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Access problems with data restored from a W2K Server to a 2003 server

Posted on 2006-11-21
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Last Modified: 2010-04-18
Hello,

I recently had a problem with a failed W2K fileserver and the only replacement PC was a Windows 2003 server.  I restored the data using Backup Exec 8.6, and while the data restored successfully, users now have problems accessing this data.  They have read-only access, but cannot create new documents, or even modify\save old documents.

I have tried a variety of things (I did a search on this web site), including taking ownership of a folder, reapplying the permissions, modifying the Read Only attributes, but nothing is working.  There is approximately 190GB of data, so I don't fancy a folder by folder solution!

As you can imagine, this is causing my users severe difficulties.

Hopefully someone can help me!
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Question by:wandascott
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by:AndresM
ID: 17987589
There are two type of permissions: share level and ntfs level. Did you check both? 'cause if at NTFS level they have change permissions, but read at share level, they'll have read.
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by:wandascott
ID: 17987707
Hi AndresM, thanks for your speedy response!

They have read at share level - If I change this to full control, will the permissions already set at NTFS level then set the level of permission they actually get?

Thanks very much.
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AndresM earned 500 total points
ID: 17987747
Yes, if you change the share to change permissions or full control, then NTFS permissions will prevent them for deleting files if they don't have to.
Example:
share: change , ntfs: read -> they will have read access
share: change , ntfs: change-> they will have change access
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Author Comment

by:wandascott
ID: 17987807
This has solved it, thanks very much!  I think I need to do a Windows 2003 course!!!!!!
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