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Computer can't to Windows Server 2003 domain

Posted on 2006-11-21
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Last Modified: 2010-04-18
My computer can no longer connect to the domain but no other computers are having this problem. The client is an XP Pro machine and the Domain is Windows Server 2003. Here is what I have tried so far:
1. pinged the domain controller by name: ping request could not find host
2. pinged the domain controller by IP and many other devices on the network: SUCCESS
3. restarted the computer
4. reset the computer account in Active Directory
5. restarted the computer
6. restarted the domain controller
7. restarted the computer: I was able to ping the domain controller for a few moments and then it started failing again
8. restored the computer to the latest restore point before this problem

Does anyone have any ideas on what I can do to fix this?

Thanks,
Luke
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Question by:bornhusker
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7 Comments
 
LVL 19

Expert Comment

by:feptias
ID: 17987905
What is the setting for your Preferred DNS server? You can see this typing the following command at the command prompt:
ipconfig /all
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LVL 31

Assisted Solution

by:Toni Uranjek
Toni Uranjek earned 150 total points
ID: 17988042
Name resolution is very complex process. Client can perform up to seven different name resolution methods to find the resource.

1. Client resolver cache (ipconfig /displaydns)
2. Hosts file
3. DNS server
4. NetBIOS name cache (nbtstat -c)
5. WINS
6. Broadcast
7. lmhosts file

If your clients and domain controllers are on the same subnet they can use broadcast as one of the options.


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Author Comment

by:bornhusker
ID: 17988046
The preferred DNS server is pointing to my ISP's DNS server then to my internal DNS server. However, that setting has not changed from when I was able to connect to the domain -- last night.

thanks.
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LVL 19

Accepted Solution

by:
feptias earned 350 total points
ID: 17988153
The setting may not have changed from last night, but it would strongly recommend that you change it if you want to fix the problem. Your preferred DNS server should be set to the internal DNS server. It has to look at that DNS server in order to find the domain controller and to authenticate your login.
0
 

Author Comment

by:bornhusker
ID: 17988246
I changed my preferred DNS server to my internal DNS server and it started working. The internal DSN server should be my primary DNS server and I should use the ISP's DNS server as a secondary server.
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LVL 31

Expert Comment

by:Toni Uranjek
ID: 17988306
The prefered DNS server on your client should always point to your internal DNS server which should use external ISP DNS as forwarder! In your case, if your ISP DNS server responds, client will not issue another DNS query to your internal DNS.
0
 
LVL 31

Expert Comment

by:Toni Uranjek
ID: 17988331
You should NOT use IPS DNS as secondary DNS. Your ISP's DNS  doesn't know how to resolve SRV resource records!
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