Windows 2003 VPN-Should the application & VPN servers be on the public domain?

In a small office environment, we have installed Windows 2003 Server (used as file and application server.  This is also acts as domain controller).  We have separately installed Windows 2003 VPN Server.  The servers are installed but there the file server is not accessible from remotely via the VPN server.  There is one setting that we are not sure and wondering if anyone can help answer.  The VPN server is in the public domain, i.e. VPN_server_name.publicdomain.com.  However, the file server is not in the public domain.  applictions_server_name.internaldomain.com.  Do you see any problem here? In other words, do we need to name the domain on the Application server the same as of our public domain?
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annasadAsked:
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Jay_Jay70Connect With a Mentor Commented:
if your users who are working locally  (without VPN) can resolve the name of that server in the public domain then there is no reason that your remote clients cannot.....I have taken to mapping simply by IP Address over VPN's when its giving me grief...lazy i guess
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Hypercat (Deb)Connect With a Mentor Commented:
If you want VPN users to be able to access files and folders on your private domain, the easiest way to do it is to have both servers on the same domain.  I'm not sure what your purpose for having the two servers in different domains would be.  If you have your VPN users connecting and authenticating on a different domain from your private domain, they will not be able to access files and folders on the private domain unless you configure a trust relationship between the two domains. Once you do that, you really are not increasing your security level significantly by having the two servers in different domains, if this was the purpose.

Hope this helps!

Deb
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TheCleanerConnect With a Mentor Commented:
If you can VPN in and simply cannot browse/map to the internal file server, then it's probably a simple DNS issue.  You can test this by VPN'ing in and then pinging the file server name by the FQDN (so fileserver.internaldomain.com).  If it resolves ok, try mapping a drive to that FQDN/sharename.  If that works, and you are using the simple XP "vpn client", go into the TCP/IP properties of the VPN connection setup, and then DNS, and add the internal domain name as the DNS suffix for that connection.  Then you should be able to resolve the fileserver simply by the shortname/netbios name.
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