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Multiple Broadband Connections

Posted on 2006-11-21
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Last Modified: 2013-12-14
Hi Experts,

Can anyone tell me if I can have multiple broadband connections going onto a single network ? My situation is this;

I have an office running Exchange for which I have a static IP address, the DSL provider can only offer a 1MB connection as a result of the office being a way from the Exchange. This works ok but users complain the connection is slow. I also have an option of a Sattelite connection running 4MB+ but without a static IP. So my idea was to have a second router for the Sattelite (on the same IP range) but point the client gateway at this router and still allow mail to go via Exchange & DSL.

Will this work ? If so are there any areas I need to address ?

Thanks
RangerLad
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Question by:RangerLad
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Expert Comment

by:pseudocyber
ID: 17996772
You can do it - there are dual WAN routers.  Or you could just use one for Exchange, and the other for everything else (the default route).  However, with Satelite, you might get bandwidth, but you'll also get latency - I've heard of around 400-500 ms, which is a lot compared to a "land line".  So, yeah, you can send more through at once, but you're waiting 10 times longer to get a response - so which is better.

My advice would be for ehte business is this - DSL is too slow?  Then step up for a "real business class" connection - call around to Telcos and see what they can do for you - Time Warner, Global Crossing, Bellsouth, Verizon, etc.  You can get a fractinal DS3, or an Ethernet handoff for a lot less than years agao.  Also, you gain Service Level Agreements - where the connection stays up or some one pays $$ somehow.  Plus, you get more features from the telcos - such as IP space, advertising your public IP's, etc.
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Author Comment

by:RangerLad
ID: 17996915
That sounds like good advice, thank you. The firm is small so have not got the sort of budget (even at todays reduced rates) to look at a leased line.

So am I right in thinking that both incoming connections can come into their respective routers and then both feed into the same switch to make them available to the network ?
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Expert Comment

by:pseudocyber
ID: 17996956
Yes.  One would be the default router.  The other could be set up with host route statements (on Exchange) to force it to be used instead of the default router.

Love clients that want to do more for no money.
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Author Comment

by:RangerLad
ID: 17997050
So the host route statements, are they set up within Exchange or the non-default router ? Can you give any example statements (last question, I promise !)
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Accepted Solution

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pseudocyber earned 250 total points
ID: 17997538
Well, if you have two routers into one switch, then you would need host route statements in your Exchange box to route to non default router.

Examples:

    > route PRINT
    > route ADD 157.0.0.0 MASK 255.0.0.0  157.55.80.1 METRIC 3 IF 2
             destination^      ^mask      ^gateway     metric^    ^
                                                         Interface^
      If IF is not given, it tries to find the best interface for a given
      gateway.

However, if you "daisy chain" your routers, then you can handle the routing in the routers themselves.

Net A                Net B
  |                       |
  |                       |
Router A ----- Router B
                           |
                           |
                      Exchange

So, all the routing is done in Router B, not the Exchange Box.  Then, just leave the routing alone (none) on Exahange and rely on default routing.
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Author Comment

by:RangerLad
ID: 17997923
That is top information, thank you very much

RangerLad
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