Save For Web images not as intense

View a Photoshop document, colors look bright and intense. When I do a "save for web" out of Photoshop, my settings are JPEG, quality "high" (60), Progressive is checked, blur is zero. ICC Profile not checked, Matte not selected. My resulting JPG images are not nearly as intense, colors are sort of faded. Is this a limitation of the JPG file type? Or has something to do with profiles? I have generally avoided Profiles in the past, favoring strict RGB values, but this file is coming from another designer and something seems not quite right.

Thank you.
Brad BansnerWeb DeveloperAsked:
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BongSooConnect With a Mentor Commented:
I doubt its a profile issue. Have you tried flattening it to see if that does anything? I would try that, and then save it out as a tiff and view the tiff. If the tiff looks good, it might be in your export. If it doesn't, there might be something going on in the layered file.
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Irwin SantosComputer Integration SpecialistCommented:
When you save for web, the choices you have determine how big the file gets in an acceptable format for display.  If you are using real-life images, like photos...then change the quality to 100%. This will make your image look really close to your original source.
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Brad BansnerWeb DeveloperAuthor Commented:
Have to keep the file size down. Its not really photographic, more graphical. Even colored areas are not the right color.
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Brad BansnerWeb DeveloperAuthor Commented:
By the way, I'm on Photoshop 7.0.
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Irwin SantosComputer Integration SpecialistCommented:
Ok...then if they are NOT photographic images, use GIF...  GIF is a format that has a maximum of 256 colors, and filesize is low. This will give a close approximate in color display.

Ultimately, if you need exactness, then you have to use JPEG...play with percentage setting to get the best output.  Bottomline is that you can't get a quality image without some kind of sacrifice.
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Brad BansnerWeb DeveloperAuthor Commented:
Its not really a quality of image problem, its just that the colors are flat out wrong.
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BongSooCommented:
What colorspace are you starting from (RGB, CMYK?) and what colorspace are you saving to? (RGB, CMYK, Indexed, etc...)? Thats most likely what is going on.
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Brad BansnerWeb DeveloperAuthor Commented:
No, its an RGB PSD file, saving to RGB JPEG.
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Irwin SantosComputer Integration SpecialistCommented:
When you say wrong...are you comparing your screen display to output to the printer? If that is the case, use CYMK.
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Brad BansnerWeb DeveloperAuthor Commented:
No, I'm looking at my PSD file in Photoshop and comparing to the JPG in a web browser.
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Irwin SantosConnect With a Mentor Computer Integration SpecialistCommented:
You could go to IMAGE- COLOR SETTINGS, and select the appropriate profile for your needs.
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Brad BansnerWeb DeveloperAuthor Commented:
Yes, I am flattening it beforehand.

Your comment gave me an idea, though. When I open the JPG in Photoshop, it actually is fine. Its when I open it with a browser (in this case, Safari) that there is a problem. I guess I should repost this in a Safari area (if there is one).

Anyway, thanks for your help.
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Irwin SantosComputer Integration SpecialistCommented:
cool thank you!
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