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putting program into background

Posted on 2006-11-27
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Last Modified: 2012-05-05
There's an app that I start that I want to keep running after I log out. I do this by running something like:
  ./appscript.sh &
Then, I log out and it works fine.

However, I've found that if I run the above command and then don't log out that it'll work only until my session disconnects due to inactivity. At that point it hangs or dies or something.

It only sticks around after I disconnect if I purposely disconnect by typing exit.

This is annoying because in order to make sure it sticks around I always run it then log out then log back in so that I can check the logs to see how it's doing.

I want to know how to avoid having to log out in order to make sure it sticks around.
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Question by:HappyEngineer
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Autogard earned 500 total points
ID: 18023322
Have you tried using "nohup"?  Type "man nohup" to see how it works.

Basically:

nohup ./appscript.sh &
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by:Autogard
ID: 18023356
One more thing... this will redirect output to a default file.  If you don't want that file created, you can do a:

nohup ./appscript.sh > /dev/null &

or you can specify another file to send it to:

nohup ./appscript.sh > somefile.log &
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