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Assigning an existing drive letter to a new partition w/ Windows Server 2003

Posted on 2006-11-28
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I have a RAID1 drive array w/ 2 73GB SCSI drives set up under Windows Server 2003. The container is divided into 2 drives, a 20GB C: drive and a 52GB D: drive.
My D: drive is getting full and I want to add 2 more 146GB SCSI drives and create a second 146GB RAID 1 container, and then make this my new drive D:. My plan was to add the container, and format a new Drive F: with 146GB of space. Then I plan is to:
1. Do a complete backup of the server using Veritas Backup Exec 10.
2. Change the existing drive letter for Drive D: to Drive G:
3. Change the existing drive letter for Drive F: to Drive D:
4. Do a complete restore of Drive D from the tape backup to the new Drive D.

My current Drive D: contains programs and shares, as well as data files. I assume that the restore will recreate these shares as well as the permissions on all of the files and and shares.

Does anyone see any problems with this approach? Am I missing something, or can someone suggest a different approach?

Thanks.
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Question by:ClydeB
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by:garycase
ID: 18029132
It will work fine ... you don't even need the "extra" backup in step #1  (you should, of course, always have backups).  You can simply copy the complete contents of Drive D: to Drive F: before you do the renames.
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garycase earned 125 total points
ID: 18029172
On 2nd thought ... actually, if you copy everything to F: the shares won't be copied.   I believe a "Move" will do so ... but the backup/restore might (because of the shares) be a better option, since it definitely will.
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by:andyalder
ID: 18029224
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx/kb/125996 is the easiest way to recreate the shares, save the key and after renaming the drive letters restore the key. Actually I don't remember if when you delete the current d: and assign the new volume that drive letter the reg key gets modified
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by:LanBuddha
ID: 18030422

I would probably use NTBackup and make a backup of the data to be moved. If you try to do a move and you do not have permission to a file the move will likely fail. NTBackup will restore the permissions on the folders but will not recreate the shares. Follow the advice from andyalder for copying the registry keys.

You can install the HD and change drive letters after the backup and restore or do it before...

It doesn't sound like you are going to replace the OS drive but I could be wrong.
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by:Jameshontishar
ID: 18035252
Why not use dynamic drives
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by:LanBuddha
ID: 18036148
That choice is yours to make, but in my opinion it would be harder to recover the machine if something broke.
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by:MrNetic
ID: 18036313
ClydeB,

For that simple task, NTBackup is more than enough.

Best Regards,

Paulo Condeça
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