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String initialization in C++

Posted on 2006-11-28
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Last Modified: 2009-08-21
Hi Experts,

In C, if you want to initialize a char string you would set it to null. But, in C++ string how do I do it?  I think C++ string doesn't terminate on null character.....

char * myStr = "\0";
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Question by:ambuli
4 Comments
 
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by:Akumas
ID: 18033302
just declare a std::string object, and it's much safer than c-style char*, little chance to corruption;

initialize:
#include <string>
using std::string;

sttring myStr;//initialized

myStr = "some contant";//assign value

myStr.clear;//clear content in vc7 and above

myStr = "";//clear content in vc6

const char* cStyle = myStr.c_str();//get c style str
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Expert Comment

by:efn
ID: 18033949
When you construct an object of the std::string class from the standard library, it is empty by default, so if that's what you want, you need not do any more to initialize it.  If you want to get rid of the content of a string, you can use the clear function as Akumas showed, except you need parentheses:

myStr.clear();
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Expert Comment

by:Infinity08
ID: 18035145
btw, instead of this :

    char * myStr = "\0";

this is sufficient :

    char * myStr = "";

The '\0' character is automatically appended by using "" for initialising.
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Accepted Solution

by:
itsmeandnobodyelse earned 250 total points
ID: 18038174
>>>> In C, if you want to initialize a char string you would set it to null.

Actually, that statement is wrong.

   char* s = NULL;

sets the char *pointer* to NULL what cannot be called an initialization of a string.

In C/C++ you can initialize a char array by

    char sz[100] = { '\0' };

That sets all 100 chars to zero.

Look at that:

   char* psz = "Hello";

that is different to

   char sz[] = "Hello";

In the first case you have a pointer variable that points to an address in memory where the string "Hello" terminated by a zero character is stored. The storage is constant and if you overwrite it, it may crash (depending on the compiler you are using).

In the second case you have a writable char buffer of size 6 which can be overwritten:

   sz[0] = 'h';  

In both cases you can't enlarge the string e. g. by
 
   strcat(sz, " Joe);    // it most likely crashes or makes some other variable corrupt cause you write beyond array bounds.

All that you can avoid by using a string class as Akumas and efn have suggested.

   std::string s = "Hello";
   s += ' ' + "Joe";

Regards, Alex


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