Want to win a PS4? Go Premium and enter to win our High-Tech Treats giveaway. Enter to Win

x
?
Solved

Setting Kernel Parameters for Solaris 10 before installing Oracle 10G

Posted on 2006-11-28
2
Medium Priority
?
47,267 Views
Last Modified: 2013-12-27
I am trying to install oracle 10g in a solaris 10 environment and the instructions for setting the values for the kernel parameters in the system file are confusing me. In the installation guide it says:

On Solaris 10, verify that the kernel parameters shown in the following table are set to
values greater than or equal to the recommended value shown. The table also contains
the resource controls that replace the /etc/system file for a specific kernel
parameter.

Note: In Solaris 10, you are not required to make changes to the
/etc/system file to implement the System V TPC. Solaris 10 uses
the resource control facility for its implementation.

Table:

Parameter Replaced by Resource Control Recommended Value
noexec_user_stack NA 1
semsys:seminfo_semmni project.max-sem-ids 100
semsys:seminfo_semmsl process.max-sem-nsems 256
shmsys:shminfo_shmmax project.max-shm-memory 4294967295
shmsys:shminfo_shmmni project.max-shm-ids 100

It also says the following:

On Solaris 10, use the following procedure to view the current value specified for
resource controls, and to change them if necessary:

1. To view the current values of the resource control, enter the following commands:
# id -p // to verify the project id
uid=0(root) gid=0(root) projid=1 (user.root)
# prctl -n project.max-shm-memory -i project user.root
# prctl -n project.max-sem-ids -i project user.root

2. If you must change any of the current values, then:

a. To modify the value of max-shm-memory to 6 GB:
# prctl -n project.max-shm-memory -v 6gb -r -i project user.root

b. To modify the value of max-sem-ids to 256:
# prctl -n project.max-sem-ids -v 256 -r -i project user.root

------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------------------

Someone on another forum said check the following:

5. Check kernel parameters
set shmsys:shminfo_shmmax=4294967295
set shmsys:shminfo_shmmin=1
set shmsys:shminfo_shmmni=100
set shmsys:shminfo_shmseg=10
set semsys:seminfo_semmns=2000
set semsys:seminfo_semmsl=1000
set semsys:seminfo_semmni=100
set semsys:seminfo_semopm=100
set semsys:seminfo_semvmx=32767
------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------------

What should I do? Am I suppose to only edit the system file as shown in step 5 or should I issue the prctl commands in addition to editing the system file? Or should I just issue the prctl commands?

Please help!
0
Comment
Question by:sikyala
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
2 Comments
 
LVL 48

Accepted Solution

by:
Tintin earned 2000 total points
ID: 18031474
You can do either.

Adding entries to /etc/system was the old way of setting Oracle kernel settings, whereas using project settings is the preferred option now as it is more flexible/fine tuned.
0
 

Author Comment

by:sikyala
ID: 18040877
Thank you for clearing that up for me. It worked.
0

Featured Post

VIDEO: THE CONCERTO CLOUD FOR HEALTHCARE

Modern healthcare requires a modern cloud. View this brief video to understand how the Concerto Cloud for Healthcare can help your organization.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

When you do backups in the Solaris Operating System, the file system must be inactive. Otherwise, the output may be inconsistent. A file system is inactive when it's unmounted or it's write-locked by the operating system. Although the fssnap utility…
Why Shell Scripting? Shell scripting is a powerful method of accessing UNIX systems and it is very flexible. Shell scripts are required when we want to execute a sequence of commands in Unix flavored operating systems. “Shell” is the command line i…
Learn how to find files with the shell using the find and locate commands. Use locate to find a needle in a haystack.: With locate, check if the file still exists.: Use find to get the actual location of the file.:
Learn how to navigate the file tree with the shell. Use pwd to print the current working directory: Use ls to list a directory's contents: Use cd to change to a new directory: Use wildcards instead of typing out long directory names: Use ../ to move…

618 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question