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Group Policy to change DNS servers

Posted on 2006-11-28
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Last Modified: 2012-06-21
Hi all,

I'd like to be able to change the DNS servers of about 1000 client (WinXP) PCs in my domain using group policies (Win 2003).  My question is, if I make the change via Group Policy, will it actually change the physical server IP info in the client TCP/IP properties?  We have a couple static IPs typed into the primary and secondary DNS server area on each client, but when we apply the Group Policy to the computers, the original server IPs remain (even after several reboots and several gpupdate /force).  

Thanks!
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Question by:esckeyrwm
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wwwally earned 250 total points
ID: 18032388
In the " Computer Configuration => Administrative Templates => Network => DNS Client" folder is a policy "DNS Server" to set the primary DNS server.
The policy states that it will replace the local settings.
Try to run a RSOP to see if the gpo is applied.
But why don't you just use your DHCP server do update the settings?


Good luck,

Walter
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by:esckeyrwm
ID: 18032462
Our domain is a subset of a larger enterprise network.  I don't have the ability to change/configure the DHCP servers, but I'd like to use the enterprise DNS servers for our domain (versus maintaining and managing my own DNS server).

So by doing the above, the client computers will use the DNS servers I specify in the GPO even though their local settings are still set to the old DNS servers?  What I'd really like to do is somehow be able to tick the radio button "Obtain DNS servers automatically" without having to walk around to 1000 computers.  Any ideas on that?

Thanks!
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by:wwwally
ID: 18032772
Maby with "netsh interface ip set dns"  in a script but i don't think it will work.
I should contact the DHCP admin to change the dns setting for you subnet.
DNS placement is part of the design to also avoid bandwith and internal communication problems.

Can't help you any further.

Good luck,

Walter
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