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Howto change color depth of Fedora Install

Posted on 2006-11-29
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Last Modified: 2013-12-06
I'm installing Fedora on a Virtual PC, I'm having problems doing this because the install application messes up my screen resolution because it has a color depth of 24. I need to downgrade this to 16. Does anyone know how to do this?
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Question by:jaycangel
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ircpamanager earned 500 total points
ID: 18036666
change it after installed or before? After it is installed you can change /etc/X11/xorg.conf file. just use your favorite editor and change this part.(yours may look a little different)
Section "Screen"
        Identifier "Screen0"
        Device     "Videocard0"
        Monitor    "Monitor0"
        DefaultDepth     24 <------------change this to 16.

Then restart X(you can either reboot or you can ctrl-alt-bkspace)
is this on vmware or MS Virtual PC?
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by:ircpamanager
ID: 18036668
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by:jaycangel
ID: 18036695
Thanks guys, but i wanted to change it before i installed.

The http://davidbrunelle.com/2006/09/23/installing-fedora-core-on-microsoft-virtual-pc-2004/, is how to change it after you've installed.

I don't think there is a way to change the color depth before you install. I'm now installing with text installer and will change it after its set up
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by:jaycangel
ID: 18036696
Thanks guys, but i wanted to change it before i installed.

The http://davidbrunelle.com/2006/09/23/installing-fedora-core-on-microsoft-virtual-pc-2004/, is how to change it after you've installed.

I don't think there is a way to change the color depth before you install. I'm now installing with text installer and will change it after its set up
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by:ircpamanager
ID: 18036748
There is a way to change it at boot. you can try at install screen, type  vga=791 or vga=792 this  changes screen resolution and color depth
look here http://www.bobpeers.com/linux/mount
This is what you are looking for.
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by:jaycangel
ID: 18037050
at the boot: prompt vga=791 does not work (replies cannot find image type)

If i install in text mode linux does not start in GNOME (even though i installed it) grrrrrrrr .... can't believe this is such a challenge!
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by:ircpamanager
ID: 18037082
can you type startx (after you have changed color depth) at the prompt after it booted into text mode?
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by:wesly_chen
ID: 18040947
> If i install in text mode linux does not start in GNOME (even though i installed it)
modify /etc/inittab
id:3:initdefault
to
id:5:initdefault

Then it will boot into graphic mode.
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