How do I configure a Cisco PIX with a static IP address?

Hi. I just finished setting up a new network with one server and six workstations. I am using a Time-Warner cable modem (which also is a router) connected to a Cisco PIX 501 connected to a switch.

At this time, it is not physically connected as the cable modem is set up currently with a dynamic IP address. I paid for a static IP address, which T-W will set up when I call them.

I have used a Cisco PIX before, but it was already set up. I also managed it through command line prompts and not through a browser interface. I am pretty sure this one can be configured through a windows browser interface.

All of the people who helped set up the LAN with the cable runs, etc. have no idea how to configure the router.

I would like to configure the router so it works with the static IP address. I have the IP addresses, subnet mask, DNS numbers and gateway.

Is this something I can be talked through or do I need to hire someone who is knowledgeable in Cisco routers?


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lrmooreConnect With a Mentor Commented:
How about the quick-start guide:
Either use the Startup Wizard in the GUI, or from command line when you first boot up the firewall, it will ask you a series of questions, like what IP address for the outside, subnet mask, etc. Just answer the questions.
If you've already played around with it, just run the setup
pixfirewall#config t
rsivanandanConnect With a Mentor Commented:
I wouldn't say it is easy enough. But there are basic commands that need to be setup and then your pix would be up and running.

I would highly recommend you to look at this page;

So after reading that page, the bare minimum config will look like this;

nameif ethernet0 outside security0
nameif ethernet1 inside security100
interface ethernet0 10baset
interface ethernet1 10baset
ip address outside <T-W Assigned Static Public IP> <Network Mask>
ip address inside <Your Internal IP Address which will be the default gw for all machines> <Network Mask>
hostname <Choose a HostName>
global (outside) 1 interface
nat (inside) 1
route outside <Your ISP (t-w) gateway>

Bert2005Author Commented:

Thanks for your quick reply. I read the article, and I may have my answer. I may need to get a consultant : )

But, at least I have some information in case I have a person who is fairly well versed in routers, but maybe not a guru.


Yeah, as I said it is not a impossible task without an *expert*...

Bert2005Author Commented:
Thanks Irmoore,

I will give it a shot.

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