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Standard features for a jpg image file

Hello,

I'm not a graphic designer, just looking for some advice.

In the country where I reside, our organization controls political parties.

One of our requests is the logo of the political party, just for information purposes to the people.

We need to ask some standards for this image file:
- Format: JPG
- Resolution: 300 dpi
- Dimensions: 10cm x 10cm
- Minimum size: 50Kb
- Maximum size: 100 Kb

We don't need a hughe large image of the logo, but neither a so small one.

I think 300 dpi is a correct standard. What I'm not so sure is about dimensions: 10cmx10cm. Is it ok?

Do you think size between 50KB - 100 KB would make too small the image?

Any other feature that you would recommend to ask ?

On my Windows Explorer, usually when I move the mouse over a image file, it is showed something like: "Dimensions: 300x400". What it the measure? Pixels?

Thank you!
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miyahira
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miyahira
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2 Solutions
 
lherrouCommented:
Miyahira,

Typically, logos are produced in vector format (as opposed to the raster format of the JPG file). The vector format allows the logo to be resized as needed for any number of uses, from the web to print (everything from letterhead and business cards to large banners), not to mention other uses, such as flags, seals, etc. This allows you to not have to worry about dpi or dimensions until the logo is going to be used for a particular purpose, and it can then be sized without loss of information or detail. Common software to produce the logo is Adobe Illustrator or QuarkXpress.

You certainly would NOT want to use JPG format for your original logo. The reason for that is that the JPEG standard is designed around lossy compression, which means it throws away data to make the file smaller. Every time you re-save the file, you lose more information. If you are going to make the logo in a raster format, at the least you would want to save it as a .tif file, which is a lossless storage format. You can always re-save it as a JPG if that is needed, but your original will not be degraded. If you do make a vector image, 300dpi is the standard for print purposes.

>> when I move the mouse over a image file, it is showed something like: "Dimensions: 300x400". What it the measure? Pixels?
Yes, that's the pixel dimensions of the image.

I hope that helps. Please respond if you don't understand, or want me to elaborate on any of these points.

Cheers,
LHerrou
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miyahiraAuthor Commented:
Thanks LHerrou,

If we ask for .tif files:

"This allows you to not have to worry about dpi or dimensions until the logo is going to be used for a particular purpose"
Does it mean that we don't have to ask for dpi or dimensions?

If it would be .TIF , should we ask for other features ?

Would be incorrect to ask for this features :
- Format: TIF
- Resolution: 300 dpi
- Dimensions: 10cm x 10cm
- Minimum size: 50Kb
- Maximum size: 100 Kb
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miyahiraAuthor Commented:
If we ask for .tif files with 300 dpi and 10cmx10cm, should we expect large files of 1MB, or could it be 250KB-300KB ?
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lherrouCommented:
If you are having someone make a logo for you, ask them to provide an .EPS file. This is a vector format which can be used and resized even by primarily raster graphics programs, like Photoshop.  You won't need to specify dpi or dimensions if they can provide the .EPS. You can also ask them to provide a couple of additional files, such as TIF and JPG with the dimensions you describe.

If they cannot provide the EPS, I encourage you to find another designer. If that's not an option, then the TIF with the dimensions you describe would be a minimum standard. If your logo has a lot of colors and complicated sections, they may not be able to produce one under your maximum file size, but from the TIF they can produce a JPG as well, which can meet those file size standards.
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