Solved

Maximum memory on Windows 2003 Server?

Posted on 2006-11-30
9
13,303 Views
Last Modified: 2012-05-05
Hi,

I've been looking at this on and off for the last few months but keep seeing different answers.  So can anybody give me some firm answers on this, with references if possible.

If I am building a new server with an Intel based 32bit processor running Windows 2003 R2 Standard Server what is the maximum amount of memory I can put in it that will be used?  I have this idea in my head that 4Gb is pretty much the maximum limit.  Now I know there are a lot of ifs and buts, so here are the scenarios I have in mind -


1. A server running lots of different applications that in total could use 10Gb RAM. Will 10Gb of physical memory be used if I put it in or is anything over 4gb a waste?
2. Probably the same answer as above; if I havea  server to act as a terminal server I want lots of memory for people to use, can I put 10Gb in there and it will be used?
3. A dedicated Exchange server - more then 4Gb is pointless I assume because the maximum that can be used by one process is 2Gb (or 3Gb with the /3gb boot.ini switch)?  On the subject of that, is the /3Gb a good or bad idea with SQL or Exchange on 2003 Server Std.?
4. An SBS server doing a bit of everything that coule use 6Gb if it was there?

Is PAE a good or bad idea in the abvoe scenarios?  I think I remember reading it can be a bit hit and miss as to which apps it works with?

Thanks very much,
Philip Harrison
0
Comment
Question by:Zenith63
9 Comments
 
LVL 1

Accepted Solution

by:
jasonskaggs earned 50 total points
Comment Utility
Maximum for standard is 4Gb
Enterprise is 8Gb
0
 
LVL 26

Assisted Solution

by:Pber
Pber earned 50 total points
Comment Utility
2003 Enterprise R2 is actually 64GB.

See this:
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2003/evaluation/sysreqs/default.mspx

To use more than 4GB, you would require Enterprise edition.

SQL memory turning:  http://www.sql-server-performance.com/awe_memory.asp


0
 
LVL 25

Assisted Solution

by:mikeleebrla
mikeleebrla earned 100 total points
Comment Utility
>>with references if possible.
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2003/evaluation/features/comparefeatures.mspx

>>Enterprise is 8Gb
according my Microsoft it is 64GB

also note it is GB, not Gb  (GigaBYTE, not GigaBIT)
0
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:jasonskaggs
Comment Utility
Yes i was wrong on both
Standard = 34359738368 Gb
Enterpise = 549755813888 Gb

Also you cannot upgrade standard to Enterprise
0
IT, Stop Being Called Into Every Meeting

Highfive is so simple that setting up every meeting room takes just minutes and every employee will be able to start or join a call from any room with ease. Never be called into a meeting just to get it started again. This is how video conferencing should work!

 
LVL 51

Assisted Solution

by:Netman66
Netman66 earned 300 total points
Comment Utility
0
 
LVL 51

Expert Comment

by:Netman66
Comment Utility
..and here's the specs on all current releases of 2003.

http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2003/evaluation/sysreqs/default.mspx
0
 
LVL 51

Expert Comment

by:Netman66
Comment Utility
0
 
LVL 11

Author Comment

by:Zenith63
Comment Utility
PAE can extend these figures though right?  Is it something to consider or not?  On an Exchange server is may not make much difference, but on a say a Terminal Server there would be definite benefits to having more then 4GB of memory available.  Or is this the point where you go for Enterprise Edition?
0
 
LVL 51

Expert Comment

by:Netman66
Comment Utility
No.  Not exactly.  It allows more memory (above the 4GB level) to be used, but doesn't increase the maximum.

More than 4GB would require Enterprise to utilize it, yes.

It's all about process and system memory space - that's what PAE is meant for - in order for 32-bit systems to address more than 4GB, this switch needs to be used.

Here's some articles:


http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/system/platform/server/PAE/pae_os.mspx

http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/system/platform/server/PAE/PAEdrv.mspx
0

Featured Post

Enabling OSINT in Activity Based Intelligence

Activity based intelligence (ABI) requires access to all available sources of data. Recorded Future allows analysts to observe structured data on the open, deep, and dark web.

Join & Write a Comment

So you have two Windows Servers and you have a directory/folder/files on one that you'd like to mirror to the other?  You don't really want to deal with DFS or a 3rd party solution like Doubletake. You can use Robocopy from the Windows Server 200…
Organizations create, modify, and maintain huge amounts of data to help their businesses earn money and generally function.  Typically every network user within an organization has a bit of disk space to store in process items and personal files.   …
This video gives you a great overview about bandwidth monitoring with SNMP and WMI with our network monitoring solution PRTG Network Monitor (https://www.paessler.com/prtg). If you're looking for how to monitor bandwidth using netflow or packet s…
This video shows how to remove a single email address from the Outlook 2010 Auto Suggestion memory. NOTE: For Outlook 2016 and 2013 perform the exact same steps. Open a new email: Click the New email button in Outlook. Start typing the address: …

762 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question

Need Help in Real-Time?

Connect with top rated Experts

11 Experts available now in Live!

Get 1:1 Help Now