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SQLCMD connection to a db fails

When I attempt to connect to a DB through SQLCMD, while local to the SQL Server, the following command string produces the following error:

THIS COMMAND:
sqlcmd -l 90 -S SMSSERVER\SMS_C39 -U administrator -P password

PRODUCES THIS MESSAGE:
HResult 0xFFFFFFFF, Level 16, State 1
SQL Network Interfaces: Error Locating Server/Instance Specified [xFFFFFFFF].
Sqlcmd: Error: Microsoft SQL Native Client : An error has occurred while establi
shing a connection to the server. When connecting to SQL Server 2005, this failu
re may be caused by the fact that under the default settings SQL Server does not
 allow remote connections..
Sqlcmd: Error: Microsoft SQL Native Client : Login timeout expired.

What do you suggest I try differently?

Since the DBNAME and Instance Name are two different things, should I specifying an Instance Name instead? If so, where do I find that name? I only see DBs listed.
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John Darby
Asked:
John Darby
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1 Solution
 
NightmanCTOCommented:
Is administrator a domain/machine account, or an SQL login?
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John DarbyPMAuthor Commented:
Local account. However, I just tried to run the Update Advisor, ding the same connection and it returned a similar message. I wonder how to begin troubleshooting this? I am headed into the App Log right now.
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dmgksCommented:
Is "SMSSERVER" an alias? It appears that SQLCMD thinks it's talking to a remote server, even though you're running it on the local server. Perhaps the server name has changed since SQL was installed?

Doesn't matter. Some versions of SQL Server install out of the box with remote connections disabled. You can enable remote connections thusly:

Start / All Programs / Microsoft SQL Server 2005 / Configuration Tools / SQL Server Surface Area Configuration

Click Surface Area Configuration for Services and Connections, then click Remote Connections under Database Engine. Click the Local and Remote Connections radio button, then click Using both TCP/IP and named pipes. Bounce SQL Server and SQLCMD to your heart's content.

If it were my system, though, I'd try to figure out why SQL Server thinks "SMSSERVER" is not the name of the local SQL instance...
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John DarbyPMAuthor Commented:
That helped a bunch! I am brand new to SQL Server and am trying to run through as many of the basics as I can!
Thank you!
JohnD.
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John DarbyPMAuthor Commented:
By the way, SMSSERVER was just a faux name I used.
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