Absolute Linux newbie...user command current directory?

Absolute Linux newbie...

What is the user command for telling me what is my current directory?

tnx,

- avi
progtwAsked:
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TintinCommented:
pwd
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nedvisCommented:
pwd  ( stands for printe working directory )
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progtwAuthor Commented:
you are correct.
thanks.
that's a strange long mnemonic.

why doesn't it just use "cd", which is anyway also a command in Linux?
avi
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TintinCommented:
cd is for changing directories, not printing them.

If you want the current directory to always be displayed in your prompt and assuming your default shell is bash, do:

export PS1='\w$ '

You can add that to your .bash_profile if you want it to be permanent.
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nedvisCommented:
There  are even more "strange  logic" ( at least to me)  in some Linux/Unix commands.
Command "which" , for instance, does not say anything about of what kind something is .
but rather  WHERE certain  executable file is located within file system.
type
which xterm
or
which oowriter
and "which"  will tell you where X terminal and OpenOffice wordprocessor module executable files sit
on your machine ( in my Vector Linux 5.8 it's  /usr/bin/xterm  and /opt/openoffice.org2.0/oowriter )
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nedvisCommented:
Tintin, I really, like you tips!
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TintinCommented:
Think of 'which' as in "which portion of my PATH is the command located".  It's true, where would have been more logical, but there is the whereis command for that.
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