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T1 Dns

Posted on 2007-03-19
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Hello,

We are signing up for a T1 line and one of the questions they as is "Do you have your own dns server?".  I'm not sure if I should answer yes or no.  We have a windows sbs 2003 domain controller running dns for our clients.  Does that mean I answer yes or no?  I feel like I still need access to a public dns server for anything using a static IP.
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Question by:Kurt4949
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by:IanTh
ID: 18749032
well I think your answer would be no we dont have our own dns as you still need a public dns like you say. I mean your dns cannot resolve google.com for instance so their question is saying can your dns do what a public dns does.
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by:Kurt4949
ID: 18749144
actually it does resolve google.com etc.  all our client computers have the dns settings pointing to the sbs server.  
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by:IanTh
ID: 18749271
but it probably resolves google because your server is using your isp's dns

anyway is this dns service provided by the t1 provider going to cost you anything

the reason they are asking is because a t1 is not normally for internet stuff but it is becoming more like that
If you have a t1 between buidlings for instance you wouldn't need dns as its effectively a connection between routers    
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by:HighTechGeek
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Typically the answer would be no. Your DNS server is only resolving the IP addresses of the devices on your LAN. Check your Windows SBS server DNS properties. Most likely you have a DNS forwarder setup to point to your ISP's DNS server. On the server, go to "Administrative Tools" and open "DNS". Right click on the server and choose "Properties". In the properties window that appears, click the "Forwarders" tab. Here you will most likely find entries for all other DNS domains (other than your internal addresses) forwarded to external DNS servers. The T1 provider needs to give you DNS servers that you can forward to after you switch over.
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by:HighTechGeek
ID: 18783565
Typically the answer would be no. Your DNS server is only resolving the IP addresses of the devices on your LAN. Check your Windows SBS server DNS properties. Most likely you have a DNS forwarder setup to point to your ISP's DNS server. On the server, go to "Administrative Tools" and open "DNS". Right click on the server and choose "Properties". In the properties window that appears, click the "Forwarders" tab. Here you will most likely find entries for all other DNS domains (other than your internal addresses) forwarded to external DNS servers. The T1 provider needs to give you DNS servers that you can forward to after you switch over.
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LimeSMJ earned 500 total points
ID: 18783756
Actually, Windows SBS and any other flavor of Windows Server family does NOT need an external DNS server.  Your SBS server uses hard coded "root DNS" servers to find out the IPs for externally located (which is why your google.com test worked).  Once found, the IP is cached in the server - use the DNS mmc to see all those queries... you actually might find sites that your employees should not be going to :)

One reason for getting an external DNS is if you are not using DNS internally... in a Windows network with Active Directory (or even without) would be prohibitive.  Do not point your desktops to an external DNS server unless warranted - like a kiosk computer in the lobby.
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by:Kurt4949
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LineSMJ,

That makes perfect sense.  But I'm still confused whether I should tell them I need dns servers or not.  They also ask me for my domain name which is not even hosted here.  They were going to use the dns servers for the domain name.  I'm not sure what the difference is between that and dsl.  With dsl we get dns servers but I don't really use them unless I want to bypass the sbs box for some reason.  I'm hoping it works the same way.
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by:LimeSMJ
LimeSMJ earned 500 total points
ID: 18827479
DSL and T1 work the same way... in fact you can think of T1 as a 1.5Mbps synchronous DSL connection (works the same way - single pair of copper going to a CSU/DSU).

The reason why they are asking for a domain name is if you want to publish servers over the T1 that you don't want to use your internal DNS server for.  An example of this is if you want to have an Outlook Web Access site http://mail.mydomainname.com and external users will contact your ISP's DNS server to get that IP address.  Another example is if you want to publish a web server http://www.mydomainname.com that points somewhere in your network.

If you are not publishing any servers to the outside and you are concerned about internal users not being able to browse the web, the SBS server's DNS will work without any additional DNS services from your T1 ISP.  Since you mentioned that your domain is not even hosted there... configuration of your SBS server is simple - just plug in the IP address, Subnet and Gateway for the new T1... then use 127.0.0.1 (or the SBS server IP) for the DNS and you are done.

In short... yes.  It works the same way.
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