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/dev/shm gets out of space

Posted on 2007-03-19
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Last Modified: 2008-01-09
I use a SUSE 10.0 system as a build machine. The output is an ISO file. Everything has work great until just recently. When I build, my /dev/shm gets out of space. I clean it before I build, but I still get problems with it. What can I do to fix the problem? Is it possible to resize it? I had an idea I could make a soft link to some other place. How do I do that? THe temporary directories that are created here have rather random names. How do I handle that?


> df -h
...
tmpfs                1010M 1010M     0 100% /dev/shm
...
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Question by:mdoland
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nedvis earned 125 total points
ID: 18750584
Can you post your /etc/fstab file contents?
What is the amount of physical ( RAM) memory installed on your computer?
Is your swap file large enough?
what temporary files/directories you are mounting within tmpfs ?
Have you created mount point for your tmpfs ( /dev/shm) ?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
glibc 2.2 and above expects tmpfs to be mounted at /dev/shm for
    POSIX shared memory (shm_open, shm_unlink). Adding the following
    line to /etc/fstab should take care of this:

         tmpfs   /dev/shm        tmpfs   defaults        0 0

    Remember to create the directory that you intend to mount tmpfs on
    if necessary (/dev/shm is automagically created if you use devfs).

    This mount is _not_ needed for SYSV shared memory. The internal
    mount is used for that.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Type: mount
 command to see /dev/shm as a tempfs file system which keeps all files in VIRTUAL MEMORY. Everything in tmpfs is temporary in the sense that no files will be created on your hard drive. If you unmount a tmpfs instance, everything stored therein is lost. By default
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You might want to resize ( enlarge)  your swap partition either by recreating an existing one or by adding more swap space by creating additiona swap partitions on second hard-disk.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Last but not least important thing: make sure your existing swap partition is mounted and utilized by system properly. It happens sometimes : for whatever reason system does not mount swap partition ( corrupt partition, dammaged partition table and so on)
Analyze your kernel debugging logs - type:  
                                                                              dmesg  
0
 

Author Comment

by:mdoland
ID: 18754633
/dev/fstab:

/dev/hda3            /                    reiserfs   acl,user_xattr        1 1
/dev/hda1            /boot                reiserfs   acl,user_xattr        1 2
/dev/hda4            /home                reiserfs   acl,user_xattr        1 2
/dev/hda2            swap                 swap       defaults              0 0
proc                 /proc                proc       defaults              0 0
sysfs                /sys                 sysfs      noauto                0 0
usbfs                /proc/bus/usb        usbfs      noauto                0 0
devpts               /dev/pts             devpts     mode=0620,gid=5       0 0
/dev/dvdrecorder     /media/dvdrecorder   subfs      noauto,fs=cdfss,ro,procuid,
nosuid,nodev,exec,iocharset=utf8 0 0
/dev/fd0             /media/floppy        subfs      noauto,fs=floppyfss,procuid
,nodev,nosuid,sync 0 0
none                 /subdomain       subdomainfs noauto         0 0
0
 

Author Comment

by:mdoland
ID: 18754651
# mount
/dev/hda3 on / type reiserfs (rw,acl,user_xattr)
proc on /proc type proc (rw)
sysfs on /sys type sysfs (rw)
tmpfs on /dev/shm type tmpfs (rw)
devpts on /dev/pts type devpts (rw,mode=0620,gid=5)
/dev/hda1 on /boot type reiserfs (rw,acl,user_xattr)
/dev/hda4 on /home type reiserfs (rw,acl,user_xattr)
usbfs on /proc/bus/usb type usbfs (rw)
/dev/fd0 on /media/floppy type subfs (rw,nosuid,nodev,noatime,fs=floppyfss,procuid)
/dev/hdc on /media/dvdrecorder type subfs (ro,nosuid,nodev,fs=cdfss,procuid,iocharset=utf8)
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