Exchange 2007 - Problem receiving mail relayed from internal SMTP server

We have full Exchange 2007 Server Standard running on 64 bit Windows Server 2003.  We want to keep our current SMTP/POP3 server to handle most domains and for it's ease of use.  We're testing with the duplication of a few accounts to Exchange - forwarding copies of messages and using the legacy mail server to send mails.  We need Exchange for group features, more advanced web client and Blackberry BES use.

We already have a firewall, spam firewall (appliance) and legacy SMTP/POP server - we don't want to ad an Edge Transport.  We want to use only Hub Transport.

Exchange uses our legacy server to send outgoing messages without any problem.
The OWA works wonderfully.

I created an Internet based Receive connector in the Hub Transport, and I think it's as wide open as I can make it.

I tried "set-transporteconfig -InternalSMTPServers 192.168.x.x" in the management shell.

The legacy computer FQDN is: mail.domain.com  (domain.com is used in place of actual)
The exchange computer FQDN is: exchange.domain.com

I forward the messages from mail.domain.com by sending to user@exchange.domain.com

Generating server: domain.com
user@exchange.welland.ca
#550 5.1.1 RESOLVER.ADR.RecipNotFound; not found ##

I expect the rejection is caused because technically the user only exists as user@domain.com, not user@exchange.domain.com?  I would attempt to use the address rewrite function, but it appears that it only works in Edge Transport.  Is there a different way I can send the message, or a way to force the subdomain to be accepted (I did add it to "Accepted Domains", but that didn't help).

I really want to resolve this so I can move on to the next set of problems I'm sure is waiting around the corner.

Thanks,

Scott

sfbAsked:
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Bill_FleuryCommented:
What if you give the users a second address in AD, as user@exchange.domain.com , will it accept mail then?  You will also have to add exchange.domain.com to the list of domains in Exchange.
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sfbAuthor Commented:

I'm not certain how I would go about that.  Have you tried?

The @domain.com portion relates to the NT domain of the network and is configured automatically for every user entered.  Since exchange is a computer name on the network, exchange.welland.ca is actually a host computer rather than an internet subdomain.  I don't see it as a simple task, and for the user to get the mail, they would likely need to log into that 'subdomain' account to read mail?  From administrative and licensing standpoints, this doesn't look feasible and I'm not even sure how it could be done.

Scott

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Bill_FleuryCommented:
I believe it is in the default recipient policy that you can add more domains, but it's been a while since I've been an Exchange admin.  Basically what you're doing is forwarding e-mail that is sent to user@domain.com to user@exchange.domain.com .  In this case, exchange.domain.com is a subdomain of domain.com.  The fact the computer's host name is the same as the subdomain name shouldn't make any difference, as long as you have your front end server set to forward mail to that server.  
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sfbAuthor Commented:

Mention of AD confused me a bit, but the clarification was dead on.  Basically, in Exchange alone:
Reipient Configuration > Mailbox, you go into a user's properites, and in E-Mail addresses you add the user@exchange.domain.com.  It seems to work as an alias which is great.

THANK YOU!!!

Scott
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Bill_FleuryCommented:
Sorry about the AD thing- I was out to lunch on it :)  You only have to add aliases in AD when you want something other than the users username as their e-mail address.  Default recipient policy holds what domains it will accept mail for.

Great to hear it's working for you!
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