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How to Replace all Hard Disks in ISeries (AS400)

Posted on 2007-03-20
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Hi,

I am going to to be upgrading a 9406-270 box running V5R3 from 4-17 GB hard disks to 6-35 and I have a few questions.  I'm assuming that I'll do a full save (Option 21) as the basis for transferring my data.  Once I've done that, removed the old disks and installed the new ones I won't actually have an operting system in the box anymore so how will I boot it up? ( really basic question there I guess)  Once I've got it running how do I  restore all of the configuration and data so that I'm back to where I was and lastly how do I level the information across the new disks?  I'm grateful for any guidance you folks cans give, Thanks.

Mitch

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Question by:TAPPCO
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by:tliotta
ID: 18759265
Mitch:

Here's a PDF that you might keep handy as a reference for any discussion that follows:

http://www-03.ibm.com/servers/eserver/iseries/service/brms/pdf/savpost3.pdf

What is your current RAID configuration? There might be alternatives depending on what your current setup is.

The short answer is that your full-system backups contain everything needed to boot and restore. And note that it's plural -- "full-system backups". You _don't_ want to discover a media error while doing a restore from your only copy. Ideally, the backups are done to media from two different vendors. Next best is media from two different serial number ranges because sometimes manufacturing causes inherent errors in serial runs.

Tom
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by:TAPPCO
ID: 18759388
Hi Tom,

It's a RAID 5 configuration.  

I fully understand your comment on the back-ups being multiple.  I guess that means I get to watch the paint dry for several weekends instead of just one.  With regard to booting up after the new disks are installed do you mean I'll just have tape # 1 in the drive and boot from that?  Are their special commands to boot from tape?

Mitch
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tliotta earned 125 total points
ID: 18782188
Mitch:

I thought someone else might take ownership of this, but it looks like work is getting to a lot of us.

You can boot from your full-system save because it includes the SAVSYS as its first direct save operation. Restore procedures that reference a D-type manual IPL from a SAVSYS are appropriate from a full-system save. If you've reviewed the Backup And Restore manual and saw numerous SAVSYS references, those all apply to your situation.

It's likely that a full-system save is better than general alternatives because everything is on a single set of media and already in the sequence you need most. There's little need for making sure you have the right media volumes. You won't need to collect a SAVSYS tape, a tape for configuration and security data, a tape for *IBM libraries, etc. You already have it all.

This is _not_ a trivial operation. It's definitely not something most of us do regularly; many never do it at all.

I've done it before and have my personal methodology.

First thing I do is simply try to read the relevant sections in Backup and Recovery. I _don't_ try to understand everything the first time through. New versions of OS/400 (or i5/OS) can bring new screens to the sequence that gets displayed, so I don't expect to recognize them all nor know their purpose.

The first time through is purely to familiarize myself with where various parts might be discussed so I can feel comfortable later.

I try to follow the manual as it sends me through the steps that seem to be correct. In your case, you'll take a number of defaults along the "full system restore" path.

After that first read-through, I then go back and do a true read-through. This is where I feel comfortable that I'm going on the right path, and I can make my notes about each step. I pay attention this time through and search for any details that didn't make sense the first time. I make sure I understand elements such as when to restore user profiles, when to restore user libraries and objects, and when to restore authorities, for example. I've already seen the sequence once; now it's time to understand the sequence.

After the detailed read-through, the actual system restore doesn't seem that bad. Even if the screens manage to differ from the manual, I can find everything in the manual that I need, and even recover quickly if I screwed up.

It's always easier to do things a second time, and the two read-throughs let me feel that I've done it before.

If someone else wants to add detail and take this over, I won't mind a bit. But if you feel confident in your save media, then you'll be able to rebuild your system even if something goes off track at some point.

Tom
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