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Joining a Web Server to a Domain

Posted on 2007-03-20
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Last Modified: 2010-04-20
Current Situation:
Two Machines:
        Server #1 - Exchange Server | current Domain Controller for small company (about 10-15 users)
        Server #2 - Web Server with Virtual Machine software installed so that Development Web Server is on the same box | also houses database used by website | was the old Domain Controller for company, and although it is not acting as such, it still has AD installed and thinks of itself as a Domain Controller.

I am wanting to add Server #2 to the Domain of Server #1.  I am thinking that I need to uninstall/disable AD from Server #2 and then add it to Server #1 as you would any computer.  This seems to me, too simple of a project though to be correct…..or is it?  Is there any special configurations I need to do when adding a web server to a domain?

Side Note:  I didn’t set this up, just the situation I was hired into a few weeks ago.  Currently working on getting a 3rd machine to separate the production web server and the development web server; but right now it is working.  
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Question by:P1ST0LPETE
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8 Comments
 
LVL 71

Assisted Solution

by:Chris Dent
Chris Dent earned 480 total points
ID: 18756735

I strongly recommend you don't do it.

MS do not support an Exchange Server changing it's Domain Role after installation (by either making it a Domain Controller, or demoting it to a Member Server if it already is a DC).

This is covered by this KB Article:

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/822179

Chris
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Author Comment

by:P1ST0LPETE
ID: 18756793
No, I'm keeping the Exchange Server as the Domain Controller.  I want to add the web server to the Exchange Server's Domain.
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by:Chris Dent
Chris Dent earned 480 total points
ID: 18756886

Oh I'm sorry, misunderstood (clearly).

Last time I switched the domain for an IIS server it decided it would be fun to play with the IUSR accounts (despite them all being local user accounts).

If it's a small environment that's generally not much of a problem at all and can be very quickly corrected.

But that was the only problem I ran into. If IIS is running on a DC then it gets a little more tricky, it configures the IUSR account as a Domain Account, which after DCPromo would cease to exist.

Chris
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LVL 10

Author Comment

by:P1ST0LPETE
ID: 18757028
Yes, IIS is running on a DC, but it's a DC that is inactive.  All workstations in office are connected to the Exchange DC.  So basically have two domains in the office right now, and I only want one.  Since all workstations are connected to the Exchange Server DC, I figured I could make the Web Server no longer a DC, and join it too they Exchange DC.
Not really sure the process on all this though, and I don't want make the website inaccessible.
I've never joined a server to a domain before, only workstations.  Wasn't thinking it was too much different.
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LVL 71

Accepted Solution

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Chris Dent earned 480 total points
ID: 18757052

The process is identical. The only extra step you have is the DCPromo to make it a Member Server again (from it's current situation).

I don't think there's much of an easy way around a little downtime to fix any issues with IIS. However, the amount of work really is quite minimal for a website or two, it's only when you scale that up to several hundred that things start to get a bit rushed.

Chris
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Author Comment

by:P1ST0LPETE
ID: 18757084
What exactly is the DCPromo?
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LVL 71

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by:Chris Dent
Chris Dent earned 480 total points
ID: 18757293

That's the program you will use to stop it being a Domain Controller:

"although it is not acting as such, it still has AD installed and thinks of itself as a Domain Controller."

It will remove that and turn it into a Stand Alone server (no domain membership). Then you can join it to the new Domain and you're done.

Chris
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LVL 3

Assisted Solution

by:hbbw063
hbbw063 earned 20 total points
ID: 18758965
Pistolpete,

As said Chris-Dent:

1- Demote Server 2 from domain controller to standalone server, for this use DCPROMO which will uninstall active directory on it.
2- If you are using static IP on server2, make sure name resolution works between him and server 1 domain, I recommend you set it as DNS client of Server1 supposing it is a DNS server.
3- Add server2 to Server 1 domain.

That's it.
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