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Convert ADODB to ADO.NET?  Will it provide a big increase in speed?

Posted on 2007-03-20
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Last Modified: 2010-04-14
Visual Studio 2005.  .NET 2005 VB.NET  ASP 2.0

I need to convert some ADODB code to ADO.NET.  What are some good sources that show why ADO.NET is better.  And how to go about converting ADODB to ADO.NET.  The ADODB code is pretty sloply and needs to be cleaned up anyway, so I figure I should also upgrade to ADO.NET.  It is a VB.NET 2.0 Application, but the programmer still used old ADODB.

Like converting ADODB.Recordset to the equivalent in ADO.NET
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Question by:Epicmanagement
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dqmq earned 275 total points
ID: 18759208
I would say ADO.NET is a radically different paradigm.  So much so, ADO.NET does not have a recordset equivalent, though it still comes with data providers that are backward compatible with the ADODB objects. So, be prepared for a pretty big learning curve and substantial re-write if you really want to make the leap completely.

A highly recommended source is "ADO.NET 2.0 Step by Step" from Microsoft Press. And some classes--it's a pretty tough transition by the seat-of-your pants.  

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by:Epicmanagement
ID: 18759629
Is it worth doing the conversion.  Is there any performance increase.

I am not new the ADO.NET, I've used it for executing StoredProcedueres and inline SQL, and the code I am working with is not opimized at all.  For example, rather than having stored procedures that accept paramaters, the code has lots of inline sql.  I have to make lots of changes anyway, so I was just wondering if it is also worth converting to .NET.
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by:planocz
planocz earned 50 total points
ID: 18759894
You need to get the programmer to upgrade his knowledge  able .NET and ADO's or get a new proprammer.
After being in programming from VB4 to .NET I would never go back to VB6, etc. .Net is the way to go there is alittle time needed for learning.
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by:graye
graye earned 175 total points
ID: 18760442
As others have already pointed out, an automatic "conversion" to ADO.Net is probably not a good idea.

There is a significant "paradymn shift" (I hate using management-speak buzzwords) between the "old" way to do things things and the "new" way.   A mere "conversion" doesn't do it.  It's almost always requires a complete re-write.

As for performance... you're probably not gonna like this... No, it's not an improvement

But, that's not all bad... somethings it does very well, but as for "raw database performance"... sorry.   On the other hand, ADO.Net is a blessing for the database backend... you should see a drop in processor/memory load on the database server.

Having said all of that, I'd *still* recommend that you convert (as soon as possible) to VB.Net 2005 way of doing things
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by:dqmq
dqmq earned 275 total points
ID: 18762026
>Is it worth doing the conversion.
I would say, estimate the costs, estimate the benefits, then decide.

The good news is that's it's not an all-or-nothing proposition.  You can do a little bit, see how it goes, and then make an informed choice.


 

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