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Java running on a Z/OS mainframe.

Posted on 2007-03-20
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Hi Experts

I need to have a java program run on a z/OS mainframe and do the following things:
1. Create a new directory and write a new file into that directory.
2. Call an external (external to the JVM) application to act on that file,
3. Delete the created directory and its content.

The code to do this is simple enough, use File.mkdir() method to create a new directory. Create a new FileOutputStream and write to create a new file.
Use the Runtime.exec method to run the application.
Then use File.delete() to remove the files.

I have the code written to do this and have tested it on a Unix and Windows system and all works fine. I haven’t been able to test it yet on the mainframe (political reasons). A java mainframe person here gave me the following warnings about running this code on the mainframe:
1. The code makes explicit references to the file system.  File system access is not as straight-forward on MVS as it is on Unix.  
2. The code issues an operating system command.  Once again, MVS does not honor program invocations in the manner that Unix does.

He didn’t give me any further information about this and hasn’t elaborated any more on it either.  Does anyone with knowledge about such things have any information about what is different about the way Z/OS handles file system operations. And why the Runtime.exec() method may not work in this environment?

Thanks
Dave
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Question by:NHBFighter
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giltjr earned 250 total points
ID: 18761295
Well, I have not run written any Java applications, but there could be some "misunderstanding" here.

z/OS has a 'split' personality.  It has the traditional "MVS" side and the "OMVS" (Open MVS also called Unix System Services) side.

Each of the sides have their own files systems.  The MVS is is not really like anything you are use to.  However the OMVS side is just like Unix.  If you are running your Java application under the OMVS side it should pretty much run like it would under Unix.  z/OS (the OMVS part) is branded Unix by the Open Unix Group and is POSIX compliant).

Now if you were to try and run this on the "MVS" side, which I am not even sure you can, you would have some issues.

To make it a bit more confusing MVS has a file type called PDS (and PDSE) meaning a partitioned data set (PDSE is just extended).  A PDS is basically a collection of small sequential files, normally related, called members.  These  are stored in a single file with a "directory" that contains information about each member.  It is NOTHING like a directory in the Unix side.

So your Java mainframe guy may be referring to the MVS side of z/OS as the file handles are much different when you access MVS files instead of OMVS files.
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by:NHBFighter
ID: 18761447
giltjr
Thanks for the nice reply I really appreciate it, I see that I have a lot to learn about this sort of thing.
I'll keep the question open for a little bit to see if I can get any more info.

Thanks again
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by:mayankeagle
ID: 18772889
>> The code makes explicit references to the file system.  

Put the file path in a properties-file in the same directory as your application, and read it from the properties-file on start-up. This allows you to change the file path on subsequent runs of the program on different systems by just changing the text in the properties-file and not re-compiling the source-code.

http://www.exampledepot.com/egs/java.util/Props.html
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