Solved

f50 raid array ? AIX 4.3

Posted on 2007-03-20
3
521 Views
Last Modified: 2013-11-17
i have an F50 with 9 physical hard drives in 2 bays.  i am assuming that they are in some sort of raid configuration. the OS is aix 4.3. the bad drive has caused a volume to not function. there are 3 volumes - rootvg, medgrp1, and medgrp2. hdisk1 will not power up and there was a message about a stale partition but i don't have any details about that.

i have found a replacement drive and was wondering if there was anyone that might comment on the proper procedure to identify the type of raid config. that i am running.
thanks so much
joe
0
Comment
Question by:joewy1
  • 2
3 Comments
 
LVL 14

Expert Comment

by:sjm_ee
Comment Utility
The items rootvg, medgrp1 and medgrp2 are volume groups (VGs), shown by "lsvg". Typically rootvg would consist of hdisk0 only or mirrored between hdisk0 and hdisk1. This is not always the case though, so we need to do some digging.

To find out which VG had hdisk1, run "lspv". hdisk1 could be either a RAID LUN or a JBOD ("Just a Bunch Of Disks" ie un-RAIDed). Check this with "lsdev -Cl hdisk1". If it is a RAID LUN then disk replacement should be easy. However, if it was a JBOD then you may have lost data if the data was not mirrored by AIX LVM. Run "lspv -l hdisk1" - look for the number of LPs and PPs in each LV. If the ratio is 1:1 then the data was unmirrored. Now check "lspv -M hdisk1" - this may be a long listing but tells you what LVs had LPs mapped to PPs on that disk. If there are any unmirrored LPs with PPs on that PV, then you have lost data.
0
 

Author Comment

by:joewy1
Comment Utility
i ran the commands and pasted the output. hdisk1 is coming up defined. i also ran a lsdev -C -s scsi just to give you an idea about how the box is set up. thanks so much!!

# lspv                                                                          
hdisk0         000fa1cd5bfe0ab7    rootvg                                      
hdisk2         000fa1cd233a8dd6    rootvg                                      
hdisk3         000fa1cdcdd93a7e    medvg1                                      
hdisk4         000fa1cdad12b584    medvg1                                      
hdisk5         000fa1cdacdc1837    medvg1                                      
hdisk6         000fa1cd006028b8    medvg2                                      
hdisk7         000fa1cd006034b0    medvg2                                      
hdisk8         000fa1cd98c41ff7    medvg2                                      
hdisk9         none                None  

# lsdev -C -s scsi                                                              
hdisk0 Available 30-58-00-8,0  16 Bit LVD SCSI Disk Drive                      
hdisk1 Defined   30-58-00-9,0  16 Bit LVD SCSI Disk Drive                      
ses0   Available 30-58-00-15,0 SCSI Enclosure Services Device                  
hdisk2 Available 20-58-00-8,0  16 Bit LVD SCSI Disk Drive                      
hdisk3 Available 20-58-00-9,0  16 Bit LVD SCSI Disk Drive                      
hdisk4 Available 20-58-00-11,0 16 Bit LVD SCSI Disk Drive                      
ses1   Defined   10-68-00-15,0 SCSI Enclosure Services Device                  
hdisk5 Available 30-58-00-10,0 16 Bit LVD SCSI Disk Drive                      
hdisk6 Available 20-58-00-10,0 16 Bit LVD SCSI Disk Drive                      
hdisk7 Available 30-58-00-11,0 16 Bit LVD SCSI Disk Drive                      
ses2   Available 20-58-00-15,0 SCSI Enclosure Services Device                  
rmt0   Available 10-60-00-5,0  SCSI 4mm Tape Drive                              
hdisk8 Available 30-58-00-12,0 16 Bit LVD SCSI Disk Drive                      
cd0    Available 10-60-00-4,0  16 Bit SCSI Multimedia CD-ROM Drive              
cd1    Defined   10-60-00-4,0  Other SCSI CD-ROM Drive                          
hdisk9 Available 30-58-00-9,0  Other SCSI Disk Drive
# lsdev -Cl hdisk1                                                              
hdisk1 Defined 30-58-00-9,0 16 Bit LVD SCSI Disk Drive
# lspv -l hdisk1                                                                
0516-010 lspv: Volume group must be varied on; use varyonvg command.
# lspv -M hdisk1                                                                
0516-010 lspv: Volume group must be varied on; use varyonvg command.

# lsdev -C -s scsi                                                              
hdisk0 Available 30-58-00-8,0  16 Bit LVD SCSI Disk Drive                      
hdisk1 Defined   30-58-00-9,0  16 Bit LVD SCSI Disk Drive                      
ses0   Available 30-58-00-15,0 SCSI Enclosure Services Device                  
hdisk2 Available 20-58-00-8,0  16 Bit LVD SCSI Disk Drive                      
hdisk3 Available 20-58-00-9,0  16 Bit LVD SCSI Disk Drive                      
hdisk4 Available 20-58-00-11,0 16 Bit LVD SCSI Disk Drive                      
ses1   Defined   10-68-00-15,0 SCSI Enclosure Services Device                  
hdisk5 Available 30-58-00-10,0 16 Bit LVD SCSI Disk Drive                      
hdisk6 Available 20-58-00-10,0 16 Bit LVD SCSI Disk Drive                      
hdisk7 Available 30-58-00-11,0 16 Bit LVD SCSI Disk Drive                      
ses2   Available 20-58-00-15,0 SCSI Enclosure Services Device                  
rmt0   Available 10-60-00-5,0  SCSI 4mm Tape Drive                              
hdisk8 Available 30-58-00-12,0 16 Bit LVD SCSI Disk Drive                      
cd0    Available 10-60-00-4,0  16 Bit SCSI Multimedia CD-ROM Drive              
cd1    Defined   10-60-00-4,0  Other SCSI CD-ROM Drive                          
hdisk9 Available 30-58-00-9,0  Other SCSI Disk Drive




0
 
LVL 14

Accepted Solution

by:
sjm_ee earned 500 total points
Comment Utility
How about the output of the other commands? hdisk1 waws almost certainly in rootvg and the disks are JBOD not RAID, so whether diagnosing you have lost data depends on that output.
0

Featured Post

Do You Know the 4 Main Threat Actor Types?

Do you know the main threat actor types? Most attackers fall into one of four categories, each with their own favored tactics, techniques, and procedures.

Join & Write a Comment

Attention: This article will no longer be maintained. If you have any questions, please feel free to mail me. jgh@FreeBSD.org Please see http://www.freebsd.org/doc/en_US.ISO8859-1/articles/freebsd-update-server/ for the updated article. It is avail…
Introduction Regular patching is part of a system administrator's tasks. However, many patches require that the system be in single-user mode before they can be installed. A cluster patch in particular can take quite a while to apply if the machine…
Learn how to find files with the shell using the find and locate commands. Use locate to find a needle in a haystack.: With locate, check if the file still exists.: Use find to get the actual location of the file.:
Learn how to navigate the file tree with the shell. Use pwd to print the current working directory: Use ls to list a directory's contents: Use cd to change to a new directory: Use wildcards instead of typing out long directory names: Use ../ to move…

772 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question

Need Help in Real-Time?

Connect with top rated Experts

13 Experts available now in Live!

Get 1:1 Help Now