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Easy - Declaring a 2d array in a class.

Hi,

class myClass{
     private:
          int testData[][]={
               {9,4,7},
               {7,9,4},
               {4,7,9};
          };
};

This is apparently missing a subscript (but if I declare the contents of the array when the variable is declared I don't have to specify the size?). With the sizes put in there is an error pointing to '{' on the line where the variable is declared. Anybody?

Thanks,
Uni
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Unimatrix_001
Asked:
Unimatrix_001
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2 Solutions
 
Infinity08Commented:
When you make it static, you can do it like this :

class myClass{
     private:
          static int testData[3][3];
};

int myClass::testData[3][3] = {
                                {9,4,7},
                                {7,9,4},
                                {4,7,9}
                              };
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Infinity08Commented:
Also note that you had an extra ; in your initialization data ...
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Unimatrix_001Author Commented:
Don't suppose it's doable without making it static?
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itsmeandnobodyelseCommented:
You can't initialize data members in a class. You need to do initialization in the constructor most preferable in the initializer list but there is no way to init an array in the initializer list. Also in the body you only can init the whole array by assigning another array:
class myClass{
     private:
          int testData[3][3];  // required to determine class size
     public:
            myClass()
            {
               static int defData[][3] ={
               {9,4,7},
               {7,9,4},
               {4,7,9},
               };
               testData = defData;
           }
};

Regards, Alex


};
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Unimatrix_001Author Commented:
Woa... screw that idea then... static it is. Points split. :-)
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Infinity08Commented:
>> Woa... screw that idea then... static it is.
That will only work if your data CAN be static ... ie. if it doesn't change from object instance to object instance.
Otherwise, you'd have to initialize the data in the constructor as Alex explained.
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Unimatrix_001Author Commented:
Fortunately it can be... I'm just not mad keen on having some static element in a class if I can really help it, but in this case static just seems a neater way of doing it. :)
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itsmeandnobodyelseCommented:
Note, the static array within my constructor not necessarily need to be statci. However as it used as const array it gives less overhead when making it static.
Instead of defining the default array statically in the (one) constructor you may combine both methods and define the default array as a static class member.

class myClass{
     private:
          int testData[3][3];  // required to determine class size
          static int defData[3][3];
     public:
            myClass()
            {
               static int defData[][3] ={
               {9,4,7},
               {7,9,4},
               {4,7,9},
               };
               testData = defData;
           }
};

// myclass.cpp
#include "myclass.h"

int MyClass::defData[3][3] ={
               {9,4,7},
               {7,9,4},
               {4,7,9},
               };

>>>> Woa... screw that idea

In praxis fixed arrays containing const data are very common. And it makes absolutely sense to makes them static class members cause there is no need to have a copy with any new instance of the class but to have it only once. So, the inconvenience that you can set all array data only at initialization time and not for not-static members isn't so much a problem in real-life programming but more for test or educational purposes.

Regards, Alex
   
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Unimatrix_001Author Commented:
@Alex: Thanks for the further info... :) It looks quite an interesting idea, didn't think of anything like that!
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