No local (127.0.0.1) TCP/IP access, and stack breaks when I try to use it!

I am running Windows 2003, and do software development with IIS 6.0 as the Web server for local development on 127.0.0.1.  That has worked for years, but maybe because of the Windows 2003 SP2 update, or some parallel Windows 2003 update, suddenly my local development environment does not work.  This hurst when you are a software developer!

In addition, every time I try to use 127.0.0.1, it also kills the remote TCP/IP capability.  I can make that remote capability work again by disabling then re-enabling the Local Adapter.   Standard Internet access works fine, until the very first time I try to use 127.0.0.1, and then the remote Web access breaks immeidately, requiring the disable and enable sequence.  I tried by deleting the network card from Device Manager and letting it re-detect, but no change occurred after all the dust settled.

Any ideas?
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DavidInsight and Energy SpecialistAsked:
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robjeevesCommented:
First thing I'd do mate is reset TCP/IP using netsh

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/317518

Rob
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younghvCommented:
From a command prompt or Start-Run:

netsh int ip reset c:\resetlog.txt

Vic
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younghvCommented:
Arghhh!
Too fast for me.

Vic
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robjeevesCommented:
Annoying isn't it? JayJay just beat me to Dc issues.  So upsetting when you submit and there is something else above your post :)
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DavidInsight and Energy SpecialistAuthor Commented:
The netsh int ip reset c:\resetlog.txt did give me local access, and I thought all was well.  However, the local access still resulted in the remote access dying.  Since then, I have been cycling through netsh, resetting the TCP/IP setting for the local adapter, disabling and enabling, and rebooting.  Still no stability.

I also removed the line for 127.0.0.1 from the hosts file.  I also notice that if I ping, for example, 127.0.2.2, the echo back comes from 127.0.0.1.  The mask is 255.255.255.0.  Isn't that echo back unexpected?

Does any of this shed more light on the problem?
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younghvCommented:
opalcomp,
It is unbelievable, but the entire IP range of 127.x.x.x is 'set aside' to always mean 'Local Host'.
Pinging 127.254.254.254 will return local host also.

Check out this post here on EE for some great discussion (and testing): http://www.experts-exchange.com/Networking/Misc/Q_21545829.html

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DavidInsight and Energy SpecialistAuthor Commented:
Don't know how I missed this - the problem is not with local access, it is a problem with my copy of MS SQL Server 2005, in fact, it is a problem with data access via ODBC.  If I run a local page with just HTML, that is fine.  If I use the SQL Server Manager, that is also fine.  The problem occurs when my ColdFusion page attempts to connect to SQL Server 2005; that is when there is a problem.

This started after the W2003 SP2 update and a security fix for SQL Server, I believe.  I have since tried to re-installed MDAC 2.8, and did that but no help.  Perhaps I need to go to the SQL Server area at this point?
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DavidInsight and Energy SpecialistAuthor Commented:
Well, it appears the crisis is over.  I isolated the problem to a single SQL Server database, which happened to be the one that I have been working on the most for the last few months.  After running CHKDSK /F on the three hard drives, I still had to delete the entire database, take a backup from the live database and restore it locally, and delete and re-define the ODBC entry as well.  After doing that, it finally appears to be working.

I am going to reward each of you 1/2 the points - what do you think?
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younghvCommented:
Hi opalcomp,
Great news that you figured it out.
I have a customer with an SQL data base problem and I may have to ask you for some help.

"Askers" can do anything they want with points, but you probably should post a request in http://www.experts-exchange.com/Community_Support/General/ (Free questions) asking that this be "PAQ'ed" with your answer selected.

Glad you solved it.

Vic
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DavidInsight and Energy SpecialistAuthor Commented:
You two can split the points, since yo answered the original question... I hope I have some left for future problems!
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