• Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 294
  • Last Modified:

connecting 2 ethernet ports together in seperate rooms

I have a ethernet connection in each room of my house. Connecting these cables to each other I have a pannel in the garage that they all connect to, bare wire, like horizontal metal plates with slots in them for the wires to slide. I would like to directly connect one room to another. Can anyone tell me how to do this. I thought I had the cable guy come out and do it, but it does not work. It looked like he just made sure the wires from each cable were in the same slots, then put a metal cap on them. Please help.
0
stevek65
Asked:
stevek65
1 Solution
 
zceororloCommented:
Sounds like you are talking about phone wires on a 66 block. Does it look like the pictures in the link below?

http://images.google.com/images?sourceid=ie7&rls=com.microsoft:en-US&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&q=66%20block&um=1&sa=N&tab=wi

0
 
stevek65Author Commented:
yes, thank you.
0
 
louriteCommented:
The metals caps are called bridging clips and the panel is called a 66 block, just FYI.  If you have access to a toner (a device that will allow you inject a tone onto the wire) this will allow you to trace the cable all the way through to make sure that the correct jacks are the ones cross connected.

If you are sure that the cables are the correct ones the break could be anywhere including at the jack themselves.  One thing that may help is to unscrew the jack and try and describe the termination and we may be able to provide more info as far as what to trouble shoot next.
0
How do you know if your security is working?

Protecting your business doesn’t have to mean sifting through endless alerts and notifications. With WatchGuard Total Security Suite, you can feel confident that your business is secure, meaning you can get back to the things that have been sitting on your to-do list.

 
Rob WilliamsCommented:
66 blocks are not intended for network use, but rather telephone as pointed out by lourite. They also use a different pin out configuration called USOC, as opposed to CAT5/network which uses TIA/EIA 568 A or B
Good chance the cable installer has connected the pins for telephone (3,4,5,& 6) rather than those for network (1,2,3&6).
If you are "shorting" these out for a direct connection, 1,2 and 3,6 also need to be "crossed over". Regardless, unless using proper CAT5 termination and cabling components you will not be able to connect at 100mbps, but rather 10mbps at best. Network cabling is very fussy compared to telephone.
0
 
DarrylHadfieldCommented:
Why do you want to directly connect the two rooms? Doing so would mean each of those rooms are disconnected from anything else in the house.

Are you trying to set up something like a Cable or DSL modem in one room, and access it from another room?
0
 
AlexanderREnterprise Web DeveloperCommented:
You didnt specify what exactly you want to connect between two rooms.  What device one end of the wire exits and enters on the other.  Asuming its a computer network, then why have panels, unless you are using those thick cables with multiple pares, for connection different rooms with many computer across large distances.  Cant you just use a switch?  But if you have a good reason not to use one, (like absence of power outlet), then for data transmition you are to use a 110 block http://images.google.com/images?svnum=10&um=1&hl=en&rls=com.microsoft%3Aen-US&q=110+block (for basic reasons stated by RobWill).  The cable guy has to know ethernet technology, no offence to him, but if he is the phone guy (since use of 66 block), he may not know wire configs for ethernet. Just saying this becuase last time i worked with one of those persons, he thoughed that the ordinary switch was the server, which created quite a confusion.

With panels you have to be carefull of not having a total distance over 300 ft, as the ethernet signals lose strength at such distance.

If it is a computer to computer (same to same) device then the overall setup must be a cross over. http://techpubs.sgi.com/library/dynaweb_docs/linux/SGI_EndUser/books/SGIconsole_HW_CG/sgi_html/figures/pinout.RJ45-crossover.color-codes.gif 

"made sure the wires from each cable were in the same slots" , again which wires?

Is it possible to look at a picture of the block? and please specify exactly what kind of hardware at then end of each wire.
0
 
pseudocyberCommented:
Electrically, that would work.  Say you have a 8P UTP cable coming from A to a 66 block.  It will terminate white blue, white orange, white green, white brown on the left most pair of IDC (Insulation Displacement Connector) PINS which are electrically connected to the middle left pins.  So, then a bridge clip goes from the middle left pins to the middle right pins, electrically connecting them and then you can terminate room B's cable on the right most set of pins in the same pinout mentioned above.  

If you run Ethernet over these, you should be able to achieve at least a 10baseT (10Mb Half Duplex) connection across them.

If you're running a phone signal across them, this is fine - and the normal way to connect to wires like you're talking about.

If you're trying to run something else across them, let us know what you're trying to achieve.
0
Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

Join & Write a Comment

Featured Post

On-Demand: Securing Your Wi-Fi for Summer Travel

Traveling this summer?Check out our on-demand webinar to learn about the importance of Wi-Fi security and 3 easy measures you can start taking immediately to protect your private data while using public Wi-Fi. Follow us today to learn more!

Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now