Linux Disk Inconsistent

I have a Linus Fedora Core 5 system that won't fully boot.  I run a scan disk, but it won't complete without crashing.  What options do I have with this.  Will I need to reload the OS?  Can I get to the data at all if I move the disk to another machine?
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rshooper76Asked:
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rindiCommented:
Use a knoppix CD to boot the system, then copy your data off to some other place. Then use the disk manufacturer's diagnostic tool to thoroughly test the disk.

http://knoppix.net
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rshooper76Author Commented:
I not a linux expert, can you give me some more details on how to do that?
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rindiCommented:
Knoppix boots into a KDE GUI, like FC does to if normally configured, only you don't need to install it. You should then see the disk partitions as icons which you can just click on and they will mount and display the contents. If the System is connected to a LAN with a Samba or windows Server you can now use konqueror to got to a share by typing

smb://ServerIP/ShareName

and then you'll have to login with a username and password. Now you can just select the files you want to copy, select "Edit", then "copy", and now open the share you connected to and paste the files.

If there is no network, you can attach a USB drive or a 2nd HD to the PC and you'll also see those icons. Open them, then right click the icon again and select "Change Read/Write" mode to allow yourself to write to those disks. The rest is the same as with a LAN.

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