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Broadband Wireless Router Configueration problem

Posted on 2007-03-26
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Last Modified: 2010-04-17
Windows XP pro, Linksys Router, broadband wireless IP.  Can connect broadband-router-PC.  Can not connect directly broadband-PC.  Also, connection times out.  This is a friend's PC.  He was on Hughes Sat. and switched to a wireless being beaming off of a mountain.  It comes in on a cat5 to a very small, powered  box with two green lights and then to his router from where it goes to his PC.  He has an 18% drop via pings and if we connect directly into his PC, it's dead.  He can only get a connection if he goes through the router first.  Really weird.
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Question by:jtabakman
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by:darimm
ID: 18817789
I'll preface this by saying I don't have a lot of experience with commercially provided wireless broadband, however.

Usually when a provider for broadband's 'modem' (the box with the green lights) connects to a device, it records the MAC address of that device. In many cases simply unplugging and replugging the 'modem' after connecting it to a new MAC address (your friend's PC, in this case) can correct the issue.

Other things to check of course would be that the PC is set to either the correct static IP (if one was given with the service to the router) or to DHCP, if the addresses are assigned dynamically.

The packet loss certainly could be due to the router, but it also cound be due to the service as well. Either way his PC should work directly connected. Hopefully the above helps.
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by:jtabakman
ID: 18818113
Everything on the PC and the router was set to system/factory defaults.  Automatic all the way.  The only variable was the router.

His broadband provider beams their signal from a mountain.  He picks it up with an antenna connected to the PC via a Cat5 cable that terminates with little box at the end (2 inch square modem?).  From there, another Cat5 or Crossover cable can go to a router-PC or directly to his PC.  

If we used a crossover cable from the wireless connection (little white connector box which I assume is their modem), we got right in.  The explanation given was that he had an older NIC and that's why using a standard Cat5 cable would not do it.  I don't know if that explanation is valid, but using a crossover cable worked.

They came out with a new router, and it did the same thing.....no connection via the router.  After about 30 minutes, they determined that it was a MAC problem.  

I think that they manually input the MAC for the router into their system which fixed the connection problem.  It would appear that  something on their end would not automatically pick up the MAC for either his linksys or their netgear router.  That's my best guess.

We left the system wired as:  Provider-Crossover to Router-Cat5 to PC.  Works fine now.
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