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SQL / .NET Framework Question

Posted on 2007-03-27
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Last Modified: 2013-12-17
I want to use a SQL database for an application I'm writing.  It was using an Access database, but the database will eventually collapse (a fairly long time from now) because the size will eventually be too large for an Access database.   So, we want to move over to SQL before that happens.  Originally, the usage was that there was a database of x-rays with all the identifying information.  The software just read out of that database to open selected x-rays.  We just want to make that Access database into a SQL database.  However, I've never used SQL before.  I started writing code in MSVS C# 2005 Pro edition using the .NET Framework and the System.Data.Sql namespace.  Now, if I write code with that, will each client computer now have to have an SQL Server on their system?  The application will be the only thing accessing that database and it'll never be accessed over the network.

So, the main question is, "will an installation of a SQL server be absolutely required on each client system with the application?"  If I do need a SQL Server installed on each machine, would I be allowed to install MS Sql Server 2005 Express edition on each machine or would that be against the licensing (i never understand EULAs)?

A secondary question is just asking if anybody knows of any good references for using the System.Data.Sql namespace to write a project and also any good references for anything else related to SQL that I should know.
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Question by:raw_enha
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by:rboyd56
ID: 18800091
SQL Server does not need to be installed on each system. You can have each client machine access a remote SQL Server which will store the data in a central location.

However, if the clients will be disconnected at times from the network or if they need to make updates to a separate database than the central server then it might be best to install SQL Server Express on the client machines.

It really depends on the architecture of the application.

But as a general rule all clients can access the same SQL Server as the backend of the application.
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by:raw_enha
ID: 18800223
We don't want everyone to access it centrally.  We want them all to have their own SQL DB on their computer.  Not all of them have internet access.  This is for an application that gets sold to the user.  We needed something better than an Access database though.
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by:rboyd56
ID: 18800284
Then yes you will need to install SQL Server on each client. SQL Server Express will work for this. It is basically what it is designed for.
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by:raw_enha
ID: 18801213
We build the computers before hand for the customer.  So, it will be legal for us to install SQL Server 2005 Express on there before giving them the computer?
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rboyd56 earned 500 total points
ID: 18801522
If you are shipping an application that uses SQL Server Express on it I would assume so. SQL Server Express is freely distributable with an application developed in Visual Studio 2005 that uses SQL Server Express.
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Expert Comment

by:climberboy
ID: 18803418
rboyd56 is correct.  Use the Express Version, and make it a dependancy in your application setup project.  It will install automatically when the user installs your application.

For ADO.Net / SQL, use enterprise library.  It's very well thought-out, and you can get a grip on how it works without too much effort.

If you need, email me at eric@pixelninjas.com and I will send you some sample N-Tier code to manage your DAL, BLL, and Front end.

Thanks,

Eric.
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