• Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 391
  • Last Modified:

Are Root DNS necessary for AD Integrated DNS ?

We have a small (only three Domain Controllers) Windows 2000 based Active Directory domain separated by a firewall from the rest of the corporate INTRANET.
This is a Honeywell process control network domain and needs to be separated form the corporate users.

DNS is integrated with Active Directory and they all show up as 'roots'.

I'd like to configure the DNS so that it can use the 'forwarders'.
In other words, if they can not resolve the names (on behalf of their clients), they should forward the request to DNS servers on the corporate network.

However, when I click on the 'Forwarders' tab, it comes back with an error telling me that this feature is not available for the 'root servers' !?

QUESTION: How to configure 'Forwarders' on my small domain ?
                   Do these DNS servers (AD integrated) need to be 'roots' ?
                   How to change them not to be 'roots' ?


  • 4
  • 3
2 Solutions
Rob WilliamsCommented:
The error message is likely referring to the "root zone" To remove this and enable forwarders see the following Microsoft article under "To Remove the Root DNS Zone"
luckymilosAuthor Commented:
Thanks Rob, but it appears that your suggested solution refers to a standlone DNS configuration.

My DNS is Active Directory integrated.

Is the procedure the same for AD integrated DNS ?

Could tehre be any negative effects to my AD domain if I delete/remove "root zones" ?

Since I have three AD Domain Controllers (i.e. DNS servers), I assume one of them will be pointing to the forwarder and the other two will point to the first one ?
Rob WilliamsCommented:
>>"Is the procedure the same for AD integrated DNS ?"

Another article specific to the root zone removal:
Petri site addresses root zones:

To be hones I am not a DNS wizard. As to implications (short term) of doing so with multiple DNS servers, I cannot say. I don't foresee any, but you may want a second opinion. I'll get a DNS wiz to have a look for you. Different time zone so you may not hear for 8-10 hours.
SMB Security Just Got a Layer Stronger

WatchGuard acquires Percipient Networks to extend protection to the DNS layer, further increasing the value of Total Security Suite.  Learn more about what this means for you and how you can improve your security with WatchGuard today!


The idea behind a root zone is that say in an organisation where you dont want recursion occuring (names resolved by servers up the tree), you configure a root zone (.) ...This is not all that common a configuration but it has its places

In answer toy our Question, Yes, the process is the same in AD integrated zones as it is to standard zones, in effect, the entire zone is the same, its just stored within the AD metadata.

If you want to control your forwarding a little more for security and control, i would take a look at conditional forwarding rather than straight out forwarding..This way you can control exactly what is allowed to use recursion


Good luck!
Rob WilliamsCommented:
The master is here !  
Thanks Jay_Jay70
Great article by the way.
Hardly! But thank you!

And that site is always great
Rob WilliamsCommented:
Thanks luckymilos...and Jay_Jay70.
Cheers !
pleasure - thanks Rob!
Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

Join & Write a Comment

Featured Post

Free tool for managing users' photos in Office 365

Easily upload multiple users’ photos to Office 365. Manage them with an intuitive GUI and use handy built-in cropping and resizing options. Link photos with users based on Azure AD attributes. Free tool!

  • 4
  • 3
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now