Takes a long time to come out of 'Stand By' with domain profiles

I have a bunch of Dell Latitude D620's. When i go into stand by with a local account, it comes out with no problems. When i go into stand by with an account that was created by active directory it will come to the cntrl alt del screen and takes a few minutes to be able to login again. how ever, the mouse will work during this time. Any ideas?
gradallAsked:
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Alan Huseyin KayahanCommented:
              *Long login issues usually caused of wrong DNS settings. Check your DNS settings in Laptop. And make sure DNS server is working in environment correctly.
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DrMicro47Commented:
In addition to MrHusy's recommendation:

Are these laptops connected to the domain when you come out of standby?   On a machine that is a member of a domain, if it is not connected to the domain, and you attempt to log in using a AD domain account, the machine will try to connect to the domain controller and if it cannot find it, it will eventually allow you to log on using cached credentials.  This process can take up to two minutes.

Also check to see if these laptops are using DHCP or have a static IP.   If they are configured for DHCP, the lease may have expired during the time they were in standby and are attempting to contact the DHCP server to get a new IP and a new lease.   When we configure laptops for both domain and out of office travel, we configure the adapter for static IP on the primary connection, and use DHCP for the alternate connection.

Another thing to check is to make sure the AD account has whatever local machine privileges you want it to have.   You have to do this while the laptop is connected to the AD Domain.   Add the AD Domain account as a local user.   You can choose what local group (administrator, limited) at this time.   If you choose to put the AD account in the local administrators group, you can still lock down what the user can do with local policy settings.

Also check your HOSTS and LMHOST files on the laptops.   Check to make sure your domain controller(s) are listed by IP and with PRE: and DOM: entries. and LMHOST lookup is enabled in your network settings.   You may also want to check the box under the WINS tab that says "Enable NETBIOS under TCP/IP"

Lastly, you may also want to uncheck the box under the Power Managemet tab of the adapter properties that says "Allow the computer to turn off this device to save power".

Test all these things with just one of your laptops and make note of the original settings so you can revert if necessary.   Once you get one laptop to come out of standby and logon with the AD account much quicker, you can apply your new settings to the remainder of the laptops.

Good luck!
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