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Win NT 4.5 settings (IP, DNS, Gateway...)

Posted on 2007-03-29
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Old WIndows NT server, version 4.5. I am in the process of replacing the server and for that matter, the domain. There is no need for a server. Just 7 people in the office and we just need to share some files. I bought a router and I want to configure the router for the internet use. The catch is, I want to see how the server LAN//WAN was configured. How can I see the server settings? IP, PDNS, SDNS, Gateway, etc... What is the command or the setting I have to go to be able to see this information? I have called the service provider 4 times and I have gotten different information every time from their "tech" support. This is for a project that I was supposed to finish today. Not anymore...  Thank you in advance
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Question by:kik0man
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LauraEHunterMVP earned 2000 total points
ID: 18820876
The last version of Windows NT was version 4.0, so I'll assume that's what you're referring to.  

You can view the TCP/IP settings on the server by going to the Network icon in Control Panel, clicking on TCP/IP and selecting Properties.  I believe (though it's been awhile since NT4) that you can also retrieve this from the command line with the 'ipconfig /all' command.

Hope this helps.

Laura E. Hunter - Microsoft MVP: Windows Server - Networking
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by:kik0man
ID: 18820939
True, but this will only provide me with some of the info I am looking for. I want the info containing the static IP address, PDNS, SNDS, Gatway, Subnet from the ISP. This is somewhere in the system...
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by:LauraEHunterMVP
ID: 18821101
Not necessarily, it will depend on how your server is configured as well as how it connects to the Internet. For example, many networks connect to the Internet via a router such that the ISP's IP and DNS information is configured on the router only. This information does not appear in any TCP/IP configuration on any machine within the internal network because there is no need for it to do so; machines on the internal network obtain a private address from the DHCP on the router, and only the router is configured with the PDNS/SDNS/Gateway information for the ISP.

Perhaps an obvious question, but why not simply obtain this information from your ISP.
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