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Subnetting problem

Posted on 2007-03-29
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Last Modified: 2012-08-14
Can somebody please help me with this question? I'm not sure I understand the 10.10 private IP addressing scheme. All four of these hosts are connected to a switch. My instructor says that computer three (Host C) network part of the IP address is 11111111 while all the rest are 11111110. What am I missing? Is there something different in how the private addresses are subnetted compared to Classful A,B,C addresses are subnetted? Thank you in advance.

Using the diagram below, list the problems with the network and describe how you would determine what those problems are? Include in your answer what utilities you would use to determine the network connectivity problems. Most importantly, explain the steps you took to arrive at your conclusions.

Host A: IP - 10.10.210.130     Subnet Mask:255.255.255.240
Host B: IP - 10.10.210.129     Subnet Mask:255.255.255.240
Host C: IP - 10.10.210.25       Subnet Mask:255.255.255.240
Host D: IP - 10.10.210.126     Subnet Mask:255.255.255.240
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Question by:jtsapos
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hancke earned 250 total points
ID: 18821434
I don't understand where he is going with that.  These are Class A addresses.  The network for Class A is 1111111.  No there is no difference.  Private addresses are just reserved blocks.  Use a subnet calculator and you will see which hosts require routing to communicate with each other and the ones that do not.

http://www.subnet-calculator.com/subnet.php?net_class=A
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by:jtsapos
ID: 18822145
What does he mean when he says that the network ID for Host C is 11111111 and for the remaining Hosts it is 11111110? I'm confused about that.
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by:COE-IT
COE-IT earned 250 total points
ID: 18826071
jtsapos -

What you are doing is subnetting a Class A address (255.0.0.0) out to 255.255.255.240. Based on the subnet masks you provided for those IP addresses:

-Hosts A and B are part of the 10.10.210.128 network
-Host C is part of the 10.10.210.16 network
-Host D is part of the 10.10.210.112 network

In binary, the subnet mask you provided looks like this:

11111111.11111111.11111111.11110000 (255.255.255.240) which is also your network ID for all of the IP addresses you listed above.

The last 4 0s are used for the host IDs. Does that make sense?

Also, there are no problems with those IP addresses as long as they are used for hosts.
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