Can't Always Start X-Windows Automatically

I use my PC daily. For some strange reason, sometimes I end up at a black console screen with a text-based, localhost login just after booting up. While booting, the GUI seems to be working just fine, yet no GUI login. This problem occurs usually 1 to 2 times a week. When it happens, these are the steps that I must employ, in order to get the graphical interface working:

At the console, which comes up 1 to 2 times a week at boot-up, login as root.

Change my directory to /tmp

rm .X0-lock

Delete regular file .X0-lock [y], then tap ENTER.

CTRL-ALT-DEL to reboot WITHOUT logging-out.

If I follow the above EXACTLY, I'll get my GUI login at the next boot. What can I do, so that this problem no longer requires the above steps.

My os is Fedora 6.0.
SELinux = 'Enforcing.'
User mode = 'Single User.'
Processor = 3.2 GHz, Pentium 4, with EM64T (single core Prescott).
RAM = 2 GB.
Graphics card = NVidia NX6600GT, with 128 MB DDR3, DVI, and HDTV-ready.
200 GB Maxtor SATA, with 1 Vol Group (4 Volumes) on LVM.

Much thanks in advance for any help.
rgoffAsked:
Who is Participating?
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

_iskywalker_Commented:
what says your /var/log/Xorg.0.log
0
Duncan RoeSoftware DeveloperCommented:
X should always remove its lock file if shut down properly. How do you shut down your system? Next time it happens, if you restart X then you need to look at /var/log/Xorg.0.log.old, because /var/log/Xorg.0.log now refers to your current session
0
Duncan RoeSoftware DeveloperCommented:
If you find that /var/log/Xorg.0.log.old refers to the session that stopped because the lock file existed, you have to go back to the Xorg.0.log before that. When the problem occurs, from the text console (i.e. *before* CTRL-ALT-DEL), do this:

cd /var/log
mv Xorg.0.log.old Xorg.0.log.old.old

(choice of new name of Xorg.0.log.old is up to you). This log will tell you how X shut down when it didn't delete the lock file.
0

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
Unix OS

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.