Management Studio vs EnterPrise Manager?

Following a "system event" here, our MS partners upgraded our SQL Server installation, a subject we/I know just a little about.

We previously had Enterprise Manager, which I was just getting familiar (and happy) with.  We no longer seem to have that program, instead we have Management Studio and Visual Studio.  I am a little familiar with Visual Studio, having previously downloaded it to "play" with.  I found however, that I could do most of my regular maintenance, table activities and query analyzer easier with Enterprise Manager.

1. Is Management Studio the "replacement" for EM or are they 2 different things?
2. Are Visual Studio and Management Studio different tools to do the same things?
3. Is it possible to get EM "back".  How?
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VolibrawlAsked:
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Kevin HillSr. SQL Server DBACommented:
1. Is Management Studio the "replacement" for EM or are they 2 different things?
Yes, and also includes the Query execution process...there is no longer a separate "Query Analyzer" utility

2. Are Visual Studio and Management Studio different tools to do the same things?
Visual Studio is an Integrated Development Environment....a programmers tool (bery short version)

3. Is it possible to get EM "back".  How?
If they bumped you from SQl 2000 to 2005 (sounds like they did), then no.
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drydenhoggCommented:
1. Yes, its a replacement, although I look it as more of an upgrade.
2. Visual Studio is a different tool, you might see it in terms of the BI aspects of SQL Server
3. Don't both going back to EM, Mgmt Studio will let you manage both 2005 and 2k databases, I have a vague memory that 2k wouldn't let you manage 2005 databases, but can't confirm, I uninstalled it some time back.

hth.
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VolibrawlAuthor Commented:
Thank you  ... you are indeed accurate in that we "originally" had 2000, then upgraded to 2005.  EM was at that point probably a "legacy" remnant of the original 2000 installation (but worked).  In our new server this time around, they would (logically) only have installed 2005.

I would appreciate a little more blurb on what you DO with Visual Studio, in my context.

1. I create databases to be used with Access front ends via ODBC links.
2. I will soon probably need to create some stored procedures.
3. I will soon probably want to create some triggers, and more SQL specific actions.
4. I will be trying to develop a backup strategy and backup automation for my SQL tables.



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drydenhoggCommented:
In terms of your context, you will not do any of those using the visual studio.

Actions 2,3 and 4 you will do using the management studio.
Action 1 you will do within Access still.

The visual studio with SQL server is for the BI tools, such as Integration services, Analysis services and reporting services.

hth.
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Kevin HillSr. SQL Server DBACommented:
You don't need VS for any of your listed items, as far as I know.  Only "if" you want to create the SPs and triggers in a .Net language such as C#, and I think you can do that completly within MS as well
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Kevin HillSr. SQL Server DBACommented:
Also, for what its worth, if you have SQL Server specific questions, here is the link to the Zone for SQL 2005:
http://www.experts-exchange.com/Microsoft/Development/MS-SQL-Server/SQL-Server-2005/#browseZones

That should save you the effort of finding the right checkbox to cross-post your questions.  I have never been to this one before :D
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VolibrawlAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the link  .. I don't even know what TA's my questions are getting posted in these days.  Further, there are 10 different paths to the same TA, so a "tree" is useless in that regard as well.  I thought I selected SQL as my first TA, but who knows?

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Kevin HillSr. SQL Server DBACommented:
Your question went to Hardware>>Servers

I know, because these are the first points I've ever earned there :D
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VolibrawlAuthor Commented:
Congratulations  ... broadening your horizons ... :)  Only 900 more TA's to go.
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