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Using grep

Posted on 2007-03-30
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Last Modified: 2013-12-06
Might you know the Unix command that "would not display" the directories for which the following grep command, shows "find: cannot open /directory/etc"

This is my grep command:
grep -i searchWord `find . -name *.xml -print`
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Question by:wemtz
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LVL 25

Assisted Solution

by:Cyclops3590
Cyclops3590 earned 75 total points
ID: 18824527
the -v switch
grep -v -i searchWord `find . -name *.xml -print`
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LVL 84

Expert Comment

by:ozo
ID: 18824800
find . | grep ^find:
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LVL 84

Assisted Solution

by:ozo
ozo earned 100 total points
ID: 18824827
grep -i searchWord `find . -name *.xml -print 2> /dev/null`
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LVL 25

Expert Comment

by:Cyclops3590
ID: 18825121
oops, misunderstood the question.  I read it quick and thought you were going for inverting the printed results.
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LVL 19

Expert Comment

by:jools
ID: 18825701
do you have permissions to access /directory/etc?
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Author Comment

by:wemtz
ID: 18826246
jools, do I have permission....NO.  I'm sure if I was root, maybe I could access all of the directories.
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LVL 19

Assisted Solution

by:jools
jools earned 75 total points
ID: 18826560
So you don't want to see the errors?

Try;
grep -i searchWord `find . -name *.xml -print` 2>/dev/null
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LVL 48

Assisted Solution

by:Tintin
Tintin earned 75 total points
ID: 18834047
The more common way of writing this is

find . -name "*.xml" -exec grep -i searchWord {} \; 2>/dev/null
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Accepted Solution

by:
ahoffmann earned 175 total points
ID: 18835343
Tintin's suggestion improved to work on any shell on any *x ;-)
sh -c 'find . -type f -name "\*.xml" -exec grep -i searchWord {} \; 2>/dev/null'
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LVL 19

Expert Comment

by:jools
ID: 18840022
Sorry Guys, I just reread and saw ozo's answer! I didn't see it before honest!

I don't mind if points are changed (if thats possible!)

Just in case you were wondering the 2> redirects all errors (stderr), in this case it sends them to null (think trash).

J
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LVL 19

Expert Comment

by:jools
ID: 18841675
Thanks,

Apologies wemtz, you may have missed the ozo response as well, would you please be so kind as to regrade, I won't moan again.

Cheers All.
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Author Comment

by:wemtz
ID: 18846504
jools, I do not understand your request.  I will include everyone when I issue the points.
thanks
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