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Searching byte sequence in file. Problem with certain byte values

Posted on 2007-04-01
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Last Modified: 2010-05-18
Hello,

I'm coding a little utility that searches for a given byte sequence in a file. The source code is as follows:
#include "stdafx.h"
#include <fstream>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;


int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
      char readChar;
      unsigned char searchPattern[] = { 0xEB, 0x34, 0x54, 0x44 };
      fstream fileReader;
      fileReader.open("d:\\Development\\TestData\\test.txt", ios::in | ios::binary);
      
      cout << "Searching for pattern: ";
      for(int i = 0; i < sizeof(searchPattern); i++){
            printf("0x%x ", searchPattern[i]);
            
      }
      cout << endl;

      if(fileReader.is_open()){
            cout << "File opened" << endl;
            while(!fileReader.eof()){
                  fileReader.read(&readChar, sizeof(readChar));
                  printf("Current byte: 0x%x\n", readChar);

                  /*First byte of search pattern is found. Seek pointer in file is
                   *adjusted by -1. sizeof(searchPattern) bytes are read from that
                   *position and then compared to the searchPattern. If there is a
                   *match, the file-offset is saved. If no match, seek pointer is
                   *adjusted again to continue search
                  */
                  if(readChar == searchPattern[0]){
                        
                        char compareBuffer[sizeof(searchPattern)];
                        fileReader.seekg((int)fileReader.tellg()-1);                        
                        fileReader.read(compareBuffer, sizeof(compareBuffer));
                        bool match = true;
                        for(int i = 0; i < sizeof(compareBuffer); i++){
                              match = compareBuffer[i] == searchPattern[i];
                              if(!match){
                                    break;
                              }
                              printf("Byte match found: 0x%x for searchPattern byte %d\n", compareBuffer[i], i+1);
                        }
                        if(!match){
                              //No match, adjust file pointer
                              fileReader.seekg((int)fileReader.tellg() - sizeof(searchPattern) + 1);
                              cout << "No match, offset adjusted to: " << (int)fileReader.tellg()<< endl;

                        } else {
                              //Save file offset of match
                              cout << "Offset of first byte for match: " << (int)fileReader.tellg() - sizeof(searchPattern) << endl;

                        }
                  }
            }
      } else {
            cout << "Error opening file";
      }
      fileReader.close();
      return 0;
}

It works fine when searching for numbers and letters. But as soon as i put something like 0xEB into the search pattern, the pattern wont be found anymore, even the pattern is in my test file. Here is the output i get when running the tool on my test-file which includes the 0xEB byte:

Searching for pattern: 0xeb 0x34 0x54 0x4
File opened
Current byte: 0x67
Current byte: 0xffffffeb
Current byte: 0x38
Current byte: 0x37
Current byte: 0x32
Current byte: 0x38
Current byte: 0x37
Current byte: 0x36
Current byte: 0x38
Current byte: 0x36
Current byte: 0x38
Current byte: 0x37
Current byte: 0x67
Current byte: 0x66
Current byte: 0x68
Current byte: 0x67
Current byte: 0x66
Current byte: 0x68
Current byte: 0x67
Current byte: 0x6b
Current byte: 0x67
Current byte: 0x67
Current byte: 0x38
Current byte: 0xffffffeb
Current byte: 0xffffffeb

The problem seems to be that for the 0xEB bytes there are FFFFFF added. I dont know why this happens, can someone help me with this?
0
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Question by:b3n_
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6 Comments
 
LVL 11

Accepted Solution

by:
DeepuAbrahamK earned 30 total points
ID: 18834631
It 0xffffffff shows because it shows the full 4 bytes.
(Hex)0xffffffff = 11111111111111111111111111111111 (in binary)

Since you are using int, it will show full 4 bytes, make it to 'short i' or downcast it to  (short)

Best Regards,
DeepuAbrahamK
0
 
LVL 53

Assisted Solution

by:Infinity08
Infinity08 earned 20 total points
ID: 18834684
Try using unsigned char instead of char.
0
 
LVL 53

Expert Comment

by:Infinity08
ID: 18834713
Did DeepuAbrahamK's post help you ?

Changing i from int to short will not change anything for your problem as far as I can see ...

And short is usually 2 bytes, not 1 byte.
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Author Comment

by:b3n_
ID: 18834723
it helped because he pointed out the general problem. i gave you points too cause your solution helped me fix the program. maybe i should have given you some more points, sorry for that.
0
 
LVL 53

Expert Comment

by:Infinity08
ID: 18834787
No, that's not the reason I asked - I just wanted to make sure that you knew that using "short" will not fix the problem.

I wasn't critiquing the way you allocated points, because that's your decision - you alone know which posts helped you :)
0
 
LVL 11

Expert Comment

by:DeepuAbrahamK
ID: 18834932
b3n, I have overlooked that, I think you got my intension correctly.. Thanks
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